Humid basement

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Old 07-06-06, 08:01 AM
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Humid basement

I have a 6 year old home on a 2600 sqft unfinished basement. We have hydronic in-floor radiant heat in the basement, although it rarely comes on because the basement is always a comfortable temperature. We do not have any air conditioning in the basement. Since the basement is always a comfortable temperature, we don't really need heat or ac down there. But the air is really humid and stale. Is there a solution that will take out the humidity and circulate some fresh air down there without fully heating and cooling the space? We do use a small portable dehumidifier, but with such a large space, portable units are just not adequate or efficient.
Thanks for any advice,
Allie
 
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Old 07-06-06, 11:15 AM
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The easiest and cheapest solution would be to add a few supply and return registers in the basement. They will circulate the air and lower the humidity level. If you do not need the heat in the winter, then just close of the grills. This could be done for less than $100 in parts.

You will never have to worry about emptying the dehumidifier tank.
 
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Old 07-06-06, 11:20 AM
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www,therma-stor.com
 
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Old 07-07-06, 10:32 AM
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Thanks for the replies. We don't have forced air, so no cutting in extra registers.
airman, do you have a thermastor installed? Does it work for you? Does it use much power? They look like the solution we need. OUr basement right now is 71 degrees when it is 90 outside, so we don't want more cooling, just dehumidifying,
Thanks,
Allie
 
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Old 07-07-06, 11:05 AM
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No I don't have one in m home but have sold to schools business and home owners. They work very good! Therma-stor is very energy friendly. They use a lot less electricity than a store purchased energy star rated dehumidifier uses. They will filter the air also with their merv 11 filter. Plus down the road you can introduce fresh air into your home with these units. Now this product just like the rest will make heat!
 
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Old 07-07-06, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by allie2
so we don't want more cooling, just dehumidifying
Dehumidifying will remove warm moist air, so it will actually cool things down.
 
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Old 07-07-06, 01:39 PM
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I am in a similar situation. I have baseboard heat and my A/C is in the attic with only one large return that sits on the ceiling below my attic, so there is no (easy) way to get the return to the basement.

My neighbor is in a similar situation and swears by "Humidex". It is basically a quiet exhaust system with a humidistat on it that sits in your basement. It sucks the clean/dry air from your upstairs and expells the musty air.

There are no buckets to empty and they claim to be cheaper to run.

I had considered installing it years ago, but didn't know what affect it would have on my air conditioning/electric bill since it takes conditioned air from the household.

Recently I have begun to reconsider Humidex because if I were to run A/C directly to the basement, it would cost even more per month in electric!

Also, I recently heard a commercial for another product that is similar to Humidex, but I can't remember it's name! I it was something like air-dry or breath-air or something, but I can't find it on google. (I did find a different competitor, however).

http://www.humidexatlantic.com/
http://www.mustybasementsolution.com/

UPDATE/EDIT:
Here's a do-it-yourself one

http://www.healthybasements.com/the_eliminator.html


I'll most likely go with a humidex, just because my neigbor loves it.
 
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Old 07-07-06, 03:15 PM
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Read my post under Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning / Dehumidifiers & Humidifiers about Humidex! Your AC will have to run a lot harder with this one.
 
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Old 07-09-06, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994
Read my post under Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning / Dehumidifiers & Humidifiers about Humidex! Your AC will have to run a lot harder with this one.
Well, won't the alternative of adding the A/C directly to the basement make the AC run a lot harder too? The A/C running a lot harder is why I originally decided NOT to install humidex. But after I thought about adding returns to the basement I thought it was silly to care that humidex makes it run harder since running it harder would occur in either case.

Also, running my dehumifier 24/7 probably adds a similar amount to my electric bill.
 
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Old 07-09-06, 10:13 AM
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If you don't need heating or cooling in your basement I would not put vents down their! If you size a dehumidifier correctly it will not have to run 24/7. The problem with the Humidex is it is creating a negative pressure in the home. It should be in a positive to keep pollutants out of the home!
 
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Old 07-11-06, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994
If you don't need heating or cooling in your basement I would not put vents down their! If you size a dehumidifier correctly it will not have to run 24/7. The problem with the Humidex is it is creating a negative pressure in the home. It should be in a positive to keep pollutants out of the home!
Do you live in an area of high smog? I don't consider fresh air coming into the home to be pollutants. Negative pressure is created in the average home on a daily basis by exhaust fans in your bathrooms, running your clothes dryer, and running the exhaust fan in your kitchen.

Also, you say that pressure should be in the positive. How do you create more air inside the house?
 
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Old 07-12-06, 06:29 PM
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You create positive pressure by using a HRV,ERV or by having a fresh air intake into your home! All of which should be filtered with at least a MERV 11 filter. Outside air can be a lot cleaner than indoor air but it needs to be filtered to keep pollen,mold and dirt out.
 
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Old 07-12-06, 09:15 PM
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Thanks airman. I did some more digging on the humidex site.
They have this vent product with a filter to releive the negative air pressure.

What do you think?

http://humidex.ca/products_air-supply.htm

<i>Q. Can the ASV relieve negative pressure in my home?

A. Negative pressure results when more air is leaving your home than is coming in, creating a kind of vacuum. In winter, the heated indoor air rises up through the structure and escapes from upper level leaks. At the same time, we are constantly forcing air out of our house with kitchen and bath fans, clothes dryers, furnaces, fireplaces and water heaters, all of which contribute to the negative pressure problem. Sometimes this can lead to annoying situations, such as fans that don't seem to work well, or a fireplace or stove that leaks smoke (or that won't draw at all). At other times, a more dangerous situation can result, such as a flow reversal in a furnace chimney that spills carbon monoxide into the house. Negative building pressure can also increase the rate of radon penetration into a home. One way to relieve this negative pressurization is to ventilate with Condar's Air Supply Ventilator. When you control ventilation, you determine when and where air enters your home, getting the maximum benefit from the least amount of air. While no one product can deal with every house pressure problem, there is an easy test you can perform to check whether the ASV-90 will work for you. Once you've identified a pressure problem, such as a fireplace or stove that won't draw well, try cracking open a window in the room. If that helps your draft, this product will do the job. </i>
 
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Old 07-13-06, 06:58 AM
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Allie - before you invest in a system to dehumidify your basement, you should determine exactly how wet it is and how dry you want to get it. Dehumidifiers can be a sizable investment so you want to get a product that will meet your needs. You are corrrect in your concern about energy consumption especially if the unit runs constantly. You should also consider noise and condensate removal (how are you going to deal with as much several gallons of water daily.

If you Google "dehumidifiers", not only can you find lots of sources and spec sheets, but also lots of info on selection.
 
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