2x2's for basement framing?

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  #1  
Old 09-13-06, 12:28 PM
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2x2's for basement framing?

Just wanted to get thoughts on 2x2's (2x4's cut in half) for basement framing?

I am thinking about this in order to conserve wood and space. I was thinking of securing 2x2's to the concrete (same as you would with 2x4's) leaving 1" gap between the concrete wall and 2x2. That way, I have a bit of space for electrical boxes. Would the 2x2's be sturdy enough to support the drywall or would I have to secure them to the concrete walls like furr strips?
Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-13-06, 12:33 PM
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I do not think it's a good idea. I have seen basemenst framed in 2"X 3" and I would consider that a minimum. Personally I think they should be 2" X 4" on 24" centers. 2" X 2" would be just too weak.
 
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Old 09-13-06, 12:44 PM
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Lay a 2x4" across something like a couple sawhorses with one of the 2" sides down and the press down in the middle. Pretty rigid. Now do the same thing with a 4" side down. Flexes quite a bit. That's why you want to go with 2x4" for the walls.
 
  #4  
Old 09-13-06, 01:01 PM
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2x2s

You can use 2x2s if you attach them to the wall. You can pre-drill them for electrical if you want. - Much easier.

I did this with 2 layers of 3/4" rigid between the 2x2s. I used shallow electrical boxes. I cut one layer of foam to string the romax for the wall outlets (not enough room in the shallow boxes for fancy wiring). Use metal protectors for the wire at the 2x2s. The other layer of foam finished off the wall before sheet rocking. All my switching electrical was from overhead and I tried to put the switches in the interior frame walls.

Dick
 
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Old 09-13-06, 05:30 PM
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Why not 1x3
 
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Old 09-13-06, 05:53 PM
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2x2's for basement framing?

Airman -

1x3 - Try to turn it, attach it and make it work.

If you are worried about material cost, its pennies on a whole basement one way ot the other.

If you don't use 2x2s on the wall, the other logical choice is 2x4s framed floor to ceiling. - Two different approaches.

Proper air circulation and returns in the basement are still a necessity for a good project.

Dick
 
  #7  
Old 09-13-06, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry
Airman -

1x3 - Try to turn it, attach it and make it work.

If you are worried about material cost, its pennies on a whole basement one way ot the other.

If you don't use 2x2s on the wall, the other logical choice is 2x4s framed floor to ceiling. - Two different approaches.

Proper air circulation and returns in the basement are still a necessity for a good project.

Dick
LOL what you don't think the sheetrock will break nice on 3/4"? Even attached to the wall that would be awfull thin to nail to plus no room for electrical boxes. If you are going to spend the time to try to finish a basement might as well do it right with regular old 2"X 4"s
 
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Old 09-13-06, 06:18 PM
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Basement framing

BuiLDPro68 -

The width of a 1x3 makes it unuseable for most purposes - no room for nailing or mistakes.

I prefer a 2x4 for framing from floor to ceiling.

A 2x2 is good IF you attach it to the basement wall because you can find room for enough insulation and some electrical.

A 1x3 is not stable or useable unless you have it flat on a strong wall or are using it for a mobile home that supposedly attracts tornadoes.

Sometimes an extra 2" or 4" makes a difference when finishing an existing space where you have other things (details) to contend with, as I did. It would be nice if we could use good old 2x4s everywhere.

Dick
 
  #9  
Old 09-13-06, 07:24 PM
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I am agreeing with you sorry it just struck me funny with the 1 bys' Even with 2 x 2 attached to the wall then you have more work in trying to get your electric etc to work. Not to mention tacking it to concrete or even block is somewhat of a bear. I just can't see it. Again 2 X 3 is a minimum for a free standing wall IMO. I must have finished over 50 basements. I did it exclusively for a couple years. The guy I worked for at the time was a cheap ******* but he still used 2 x 4 studs. To me the extra material cost if you even want to call it extra is nominal when you consider all the other costs of the job. Electric, sheetrock, paint, flooring, trim etc. Always better to do it right
 
  #10  
Old 09-13-06, 07:43 PM
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Thanks everyone!

For your responses. I also agree that 2x4's is the logical way to go, I just like to make absolutely sure by hearing it from people who have done it before me. Most of the wood I was able to scrap from an old garage and carport I tore down. I will keep everyone posted on how it goes.

So what I have planned is:
1. putting up 2x4 studs 1" away from the concrete wall.
2. run electrical
3. batted insulation
4. clear vapor barrier stapled to the studs...is this even necessary? The basement remodel book I have says to do it this way.
5. drywall

Thanks again!
 
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Old 09-15-06, 04:54 AM
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1x3 worked very good in my basement. Used maze nails to nail 3in side (wide side) to wall. used stubby electrical box's used 1in inch Styrofoam for insulation. My basement is 100% under ground! and never had a problem.
 
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Old 09-15-06, 05:28 AM
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Basement framing

When you get to the electrical portion, consider the following:

1. Electrical boxes must be of sufficient volume to accomodate number of wires and devices. Calculation is based on wire size.

2. Holes drilled for wires must be a minimum 1 1/4 inches from the edge where the drywall will be attached.

Refer to NEC 2005 for specifics, or post in electrical forum for professional advice on electrical. Good luck with your project.
 
  #13  
Old 09-15-06, 09:39 AM
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Quote:"2. Holes drilled for wires must be a minimum 1 1/4 inches from the edge where the drywall will be attached."

Perhaps it varies in different states but I am accustomed to it being ok to drill closer so long as there is a "kickplate" installed. That is just a small metal plate that wont allow a nail or screw to pass through it into the wire.
 
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Old 09-15-06, 10:06 AM
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Boiselifer,

If you're going to use recycled materials, make sure you keep in mind that you need to use PT lumber for the base, and anywhere else where the lumber contacts cement.
 
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Old 09-15-06, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by spackle
Boiselifer,

If you're going to use recycled materials, make sure you keep in mind that you need to use PT lumber for the base, and anywhere else where the lumber contacts cement.
That's true plus, You will want the type rated for ground contact.
 
  #16  
Old 09-16-06, 08:01 PM
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Yes, thanks guys, I did purchase the Pressure treated 2x4's for the bottom. =)

Now i just need to get a good quality Reciprocating saw. I have read great reviews on Milwaukees version, with a close second going to Porter Cable.
 
  #17  
Old 09-17-06, 07:20 AM
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"I do not think it's a good idea. I have seen basemenst framed in 2"X 3" and I would consider that a minimum. Personally I think they should be 2" X 4" on 24" centers. 2" X 2" would be just too weak."

Builditpro - one of the first posts I made on this forum was a suggestion that walls for finishing a basement could be 2X4 spaced 24" OC to save a little time and money. I caught a ration from a few guys that insisted that 24" OC framing was unsuitable for anything including non bearing partition walls.
 
  #18  
Old 09-17-06, 08:01 AM
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Wink

Have always use 2X4's 24 on center for walls in basement. P/T bottom plate. 6 mil poly staple to the sill plate to hang down and cover the concrete wall . A R 19 block of insulation up on the sill plate in each joist space .R 13 insulation paper to the room in the studs then a 4 mil poly over that. Then the drywall.
You never want to nail or shoot the wood to the concrete wall even P/T. It puts holes in the concrete wall.

ED just my .02 cents
 
  #19  
Old 09-17-06, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Wayne Mitchell
"I do not think it's a good idea. I have seen basemenst framed in 2"X 3" and I would consider that a minimum. Personally I think they should be 2" X 4" on 24" centers. 2" X 2" would be just too weak."

Builditpro - one of the first posts I made on this forum was a suggestion that walls for finishing a basement could be 2X4 spaced 24" OC to save a little time and money. I caught a ration from a few guys that insisted that 24" OC framing was unsuitable for anything including non bearing partition walls.
Well you know ration or not I think I have been around enough to know what works and what doesn't especially when it comes to basements since I finished them exclusively for several years. Never have I seen a problem associated with non baring walls set at 24" OC. I wouldn't try to talk anyone out of setting them at 16" but I don't think it is necessary. People will always have their own opinions and I can respect that but in this case I will stick to my time honored and up to code method.
 
  #20  
Old 09-17-06, 01:20 PM
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2x2 basement framing

an inch here an inch there...adds up, I used 2x3 for entire basement ..came out fine. Pilot holes for elec has to be set back a little(not center) to make code....my 2 cents
 
  #21  
Old 09-17-06, 02:06 PM
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2x2's for basement framing?

Two different concepts -

1. Frame inside with 2x4s or whatever separated (spaced away from) and independant of the foundation wall.

2. Attach 2x2s directly to the exterior walls

Both are O.K. depending on what you want. One gives you 3" less wasted space or 6" in a room, which can add up to differences in the other items.

The electrical with 2x2's is no big deal. I actually used separated 2x2s and created gaps for the wire behind the standard protector plates instead of drilling. Passed all inspections. With 2x4's you have more room in the boxes, but still a gap in insulation and a vapor barrier. With a 2x2 there is no infiltration problem

Dick
 
  #22  
Old 09-19-06, 08:05 AM
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Well, it has started! I got the first 2x4 up on the first wall. I decided to go with 1" from concrete wall. I should be able to get the framing done easily this weekend. the hard part will be the electrical and 1 plumbing pipe I have to re-run in a more appropriate area up in the floor joists.

Thanks everyone for your help again!
 
  #23  
Old 09-19-06, 08:18 AM
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Well, it has started! I got the first 2x4 up on the first wall. I decided to go with 1" from concrete wall. I should be able to get the framing done easily this weekend.

Didnt you build the wall on the floor. Then put it all up as a unit??????? Lot less work

ED
 
  #24  
Old 09-19-06, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc
Didnt you build the wall on the floor. Then put it all up as a unit??????? Lot less work

ED
Probably no room in the basement. I had to build walls in place in mine. Once you get the hang of it, toenailing studs is pretty quick work.
 
  #25  
Old 09-19-06, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc
Well, it has started! I got the first 2x4 up on the first wall. I decided to go with 1" from concrete wall. I should be able to get the framing done easily this weekend.

Didnt you build the wall on the floor. Then put it all up as a unit??????? Lot less work

ED
We currently have a 125 gallon fish tank that takes up too much space and has nowhere else to go so I have to use the toenailing method. I am getting one of those palm nailers this weekend so shouldn't be a problem. =)
 
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