Water seeping in basement

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-13-06, 08:40 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 46
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water seeping in basement

I have a wall in my basement that has a horizontal crack running along the whole one side of the house that is seeping water slowly every time it rains. The crack is probaly 18 inches below the outside ground level. I am thinking of digging 2 feet down outside, using a waterproof type cement, tarring and putting plastic aainst the exterior wall. Now after a rainfall, the grass on that side of the exterior wall is soaked, leading me to believe it is not draining properly.
I was told that I could install weeping tile a couple of feet down and drain it away from the house, but where would I drain it to?
I have no ditch outside of my house and the tile would be 2 feet below ground level...I'm confused.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-13-06, 09:30 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water seeping in basement

Plastic, tarring and a drain tile leading to a sump with a pump would provide a temporary solution to the leakage.

A horizontal crack, as you describe (complete length and the height location) sounds like a classic structural problem. This would be due to the pressure of the saturated soil on the wall.

Is the crack old or fairly recent (last couple of years)? An engineer can give you an idea of the seriousness of the crack.

You apparently do not have functioning drain tile around your foundation or you would not have the water and the pressure.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 10-30-06, 07:58 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 45
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I disagree. I have a properly functioning drain tile system and I still had water seeping through a crack. The funny part is that I dug down to where I thought the crack would be from the outside and it was not on the exterior side of the wall. Only the interior. But water was still seeping through the inside crack. What's up with that??


Also, I've never seen any concrete surface whether a basement/garage floor, basement wall, retaining wall, driveway,etc. that didn't have at least 1 hairline crack in it. I don't think it's possible to build a crack free concrete structure.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 10-30-06 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Removed quote as it's unnecessary to quote the entire post
  #4  
Old 10-30-06, 08:17 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water seeping in basement

jj32 -

If you have a crack on the inside surface of a wall and no sign of one on the putside, you definitely have a structural crack/problem. I can't tell the degree of importance from here. Your wall is "bulging" slightly inward due to high soil pressures - that is why the crack shows on only one side. You crack is probably at or slightly above the middle the the wall height.

If you have a block wall, you are getting water into the cores somehow. Apparently, there are no "bleeders" running from the cores into the drain tile (probably exterior drain tile system). Good interior drain tile systems usually have bleeders.

If you have a poured wall, water is getting into the crack somehow. That is the difficult thing about repairing poured basement walls.

You are right about concrete cracking. If the piece is big enough it wll have a shrinkage crack somewhere (usually at the middle). That is the reason for control joints and/or reinforcement. Your horizontal crack is not a shrinkage crack.

Shrinkage cracks are a natural way of relieving internal stresses and must be planned for. That is the reason for joints in slabs.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 10-30-06, 10:23 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Horizontal vs Vertical cracks

Horizontal cracks in a foundation wall are always structural and should be looked at by an engineer. With this type of crack, stopping the water is only half the problem.

Shrinkage cracks are typically vertical or slightly diagonal, and usually occur where there is a break or step in the concrete - i.e. from the bottom corner of a window, at a jog in the wall, etc.

Non-structural cracks can be repaired from the inside, without digging by injecting a product like the on in the Crack Seal Do It Yourself Kit (http://www.crackseal.com/).

Water entering along the joint where the floor and wall meet is due to hydrostatic pressure - indicating there isn't adequate drainage. Injecting the seam where the wall & floor meet is NOT recommended, as this simply causes the water to find another way in - sometimes causing the floor to buckle.
 
  #6  
Old 10-30-06, 11:50 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Water seeping in basement

Thuper -

Your professional engineer can tell you what your repair options are. It is not always necessary to rebuild the wall. Only a person looking directly at the situation can give complete advice. Do not use a contractor for advice on a soils/concrete problem.

In the end (after any repairs), you will have to correct your drainage around your home. If the soil is saturated, you have a high soil pressure against the wall that contributed to the crack.

After any repairs, the exterior drainage correction will consist of gutters, downspout extensions(8' minimum) and grading to correct the slope around the house. These are potential DIY projects.

The water control COULD also include installation of drain tile at or below the level of the footing. This could be either inside the basement wall or outside, depending on the physical situation. An inside installation can be a DIY project (a lot of work). The outside probably should be contracted because of the excavation (soil volume and safety) and the replacement of the soil with proper backfill.

Beware of sales-oriented, gimmicky, patented systems that do not give you an opportunity for a direct comparison.

Good luck!!

Dick
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: