Sound-proofing in basement

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  #1  
Old 10-18-06, 01:37 PM
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Sound-proofing in basement

I will be finishing my basement and the media room will be right under the master bedroom. What is the best material to use in the ceiling to deaden some of the sound?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 10-19-06, 08:47 AM
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I'm no expert in accoustics, but here's what I'm doing.

I purchased "Isomax" clips and will be installing on the bottom of the joists along with drywall furring channel. This isolates noise transmission through the joists. Additionally, I'll be installing fiberglass batt insulation between the drywall and flooring above.

Here's a link to Kinetics Isomax:
http://www.kineticsnoise.com/arch/isomax/index.html

I've also read that installing two layers of drywall will help reduce noise tranmission further, but I don't plan on doing that.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-19-06, 02:06 PM
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No here expert either, but there ARE plenty of experts here....

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=19

Click on this link and read the sticky "Acouctical Treatments master thread."

Good luck,
Tom
 
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Old 10-19-06, 02:46 PM
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Thanks

Thanks for the info. Let us know if you think those Kinetics clips work.

btw - Those guys at the 'AVSForum' get prety technical!
 
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Old 10-23-06, 07:30 AM
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I'm probably 2 to 3 months away from drywall, so I won't be able to tell how well the Isomax clips worked till then, but I'll let you know.

I only get about 4 hours a week to work on my basement, so it's taking me forever, but I'm getting there! The framing is just about done, and I've purchased the can lights and begining the electrical.

Menards delivered the Dricore subfloor and doors on Saturday. I'm not ready for either, but they had a good sale, so I bought them

I had a plumber do the rough plumbing for the wet bar and half bath and that has inspired me to keep plugging along!

Best of luck to you. Enjoy your work!
 
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Old 10-23-06, 07:56 AM
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Ron:

If you are looking for soundproofing, this is the easiest and least expensive way. Between your floor joists put in either R36 or R38 insulation. Then use sound proof sheetrock for your basement ceiling. Thats what they use in motels ceilings and walls. If Menards do not have it on hand, they can order it. Not very expensive. Good Luck
 
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Old 10-23-06, 09:24 AM
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Thanks for the tip Jack. I'll certainly look into the accoustical drywall. I'm not going to do the drywall myself, but I would think a good drywall contractor should know about the accoustical board.
 
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Old 06-26-08, 03:48 PM
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Ron O,
did you finish your basement? I am planning something similar so I would like to hear what you used and if it worked?
thanks
 
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Old 06-26-08, 04:22 PM
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I did extensive research for a project I was doing(basement redo), last fall. Construction details had more to do with isolating sounds than insulation. Isolate one wall from the opposite side of the same wall by staggering studs and leaving a space between(filled with insulation). One company said I had to use their insulation, which was very expensive, and I had to buy enough to do the Empire State Bldg. Another manufacturer said, plain old fiberglass insulation worked, which is what I used, R38. Made no difference that I can tell, but I hope my customer does not figure that out.

Some or all the above suggestions may or may not work, but will definitly cost you time and material. I now know a lot more on the subject than I did, but no real solutions without lots of dollars. Oh yeah, plain old paper egg crates work really well. Good luck.
 
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Old 06-29-08, 07:00 PM
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Look into Roxul AFB insulation. It is denser than fiberglass and has better sound absorbing qualities. I wound up getting it for my basement, not for soundproofing, but because rock wool does better in potentially moist environments. I had to search around to find a local supplier. It wasn't much more expensive than the pink stuff.
 
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Old 06-30-08, 01:59 PM
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At risk of stepping on toes here.....sound isolation is not as intuitive as it sounds and often counter-intuitive.

Between your floor joists put in either R36 or R38 insulation. Then use sound proof sheetrock for your basement ceiling. Thats what they use in motels ceilings and walls. If Menards do not have it on hand, they can order it. Not very expensive.
Again, at that other forum I mentioned earlier, you will learn that by actual measurement, NOT company advertising, "sound board" is no more effective than standard 5/8s drywall and the drywall is cheaper. And finishes nicer (can you actually tape and mud that stuff so it looks "right?"). If you are talking about the namebrand "sandwhiched" drywall, it is FAR more expensive per sheet. STUFFING the joists is counter-intuitive. Less is more. Anything over R19 is just diminishing returns. R38 IS better, but not better enough (as in, your ears won't notice a difference, but it IS measurable) to justify the cost over R19.

The same goes for insulation. The "sound" insulation is better, but not better enough to justify the cost over standard R19 pink stuff. And faced or unfaced doesn't matter.

It is far more important to take the advice about decoupling walls wherever possible and seal all leaks (anywhere air, i.e. sound, can get through) using standard 50 year caulk (again, you don't need the expensive "acoustical" caulk). Imagine a fish tank. A leak, no matter how small or where located, renders the entire tank worthless.

Good luck,
Tom
 
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