Thoroseal or Drylock? Have you worked with them?

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Old 11-10-06, 05:09 PM
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Thoroseal or Drylock? Have you worked with them?

My basement is dry but before finishing I'm thinking there's nothing like a little insurance.

Thoroseal seems like the more difficult product to deal with, but I also have a suspicion it might last longer. UGL warrants Drylock for 10 years, I don't know about Thoroseal.

Any advice on these products?

Thanks,

Mark
 
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Old 11-10-06, 09:14 PM
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Thoroseal or Drylock? Have you worked with them?

Thoroseal has been around longer, originally used on commercial concrete waterproofing and repairs. The company makes a complete line of concrete finishing and restoration products.

Thoroseal is a cement based coating, while DryLok is more of a paint.

I have never applied DryLok, but I have used Thoroseal on my own basement waterproofing. It is not necessarily hard to apply, but it certainly is messy. Imagining applying a coating the consistancy of pancake batter to a concrete surface that is moistened.

The keys to Thoroseal are mixing it according to directions, using a latex additive (Acryl 60 is Thoroseal's name) and keeping the surface to be coated moist. If you apply a second coat, make sure you follow the recommendation on the timing of the second application to get a proper bond.
After it is applied and has set, it is good to lightly mist it to slow the curing.

Dick
 
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Old 11-11-06, 05:52 AM
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I've used a lot of drylok but never any thoroseal so I can only comment on the drylok which I have aways found to be effective. Major water problems are alwys best solved by correcting any exterior issues first.
 
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Old 11-12-06, 09:28 AM
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Thanks for the reply. As I said in the original post. I purchased this house a little over a year ago. I have Tremco basement waterproofing which is guaranteed for 10 years. That consists of Tuff 'n Dry drainage board, armor coat waterproofing on the foundation, and Drainstar sump drainage system.

I have had NO water in the basement since I've been here and there have been some pretty huge deluges.

I've also tested the floor and walls by taping plastic and waiting a few days and have detected no moisture.

But as I said if I'm going to do this now is the time. I just got the building permit and it's going to be a huge job so I want to take my time at every step.

Dick,

You seem to have quite a bit of experience with Thoroseal. Do you know the difference between Thoroseal (bag) and SuperThoroseal (can). Seems the can doesn't need the polymer added. The Thoroseal website cites a 10 year warranty on SuperThoroseal but nothing on the bag product. That may be due to the fact that the polymer is already added to Super Thoroseal thus taking out the possibilty of user error on not adding it. Just a guess.

Would you recommend mixing this stuff in old 5 gallon spackle buckets? Also, I was thinking of wetting the wall by using water and my insecticide pressure sprayer, well cleaned out of course! Does that sound reasonable or will I need more water volume than that? Should I hook up my hose in the basement and use the sprayer? I'm just wondering how wet the wall needs to be. Everything down there is so dry right now if I put a little water on the wall it's gone in about 10 seconds.

Thanks again.

Mark
 
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Old 11-12-06, 10:35 AM
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Thoroseal or Drylock? Have you worked with them?

I have never used the form in a can. I always added the Acryl 60.

Following the mixing instructions is very important.

I used a garden sprayer to mist the walls when needed. The application is much more difficult if the wall is dry. The moisture applied to the wall prevents the wall from sucking the water out of the Thoroseal. The water misting after the setting or intial drying keeps the Thoroseal damp and makes the curing go slower and will result in better performance. Anything with cement in it benefits from a slow curing. Your Thoroseal will still cure rather quickly.

Dick
 
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Old 11-12-06, 10:44 AM
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Wink

With Dick here. Have used Thoroseal in bag many times on blocks works great. A little hard to mix but other wise go for it.

ED
 
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Old 11-12-06, 11:52 AM
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If the basement is as dry as you say, I think I would just skip all that period. Just hang your vapor barrior during framing and you should be fine. If you must use one then at least use the easiest to work with. I have found that a basement that has serious moisture problems will not be fixed with applying a coating of anything and if it doesn't need it, it doesn't need it.
 
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Old 11-13-06, 06:46 AM
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I have one more question. How far up the wall are you supposed to apply a waterproofing product?

A few people in this forum have advised to only apply to the outside ground level so that the walls can breath.

Not sure I'm understanding that though.

Thanks again.

- Mark
 
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Old 11-13-06, 09:43 AM
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Thoroseal or Drylock? Have you worked with them?

Whatever you apply, use for the entire wall.

There is no "magic line" at ground level, either thermally or moisture-wise. Concrete has the ability to moderate in all directions, so any difference are quite small. All materials have the property of lateral flow.

The "magic lines" are created by those that live in ony one or two dimensions and believe in the non-existant parallel heat flow that many probucts use to fool purchasers.

Dick
 
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Old 11-13-06, 09:02 PM
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Okay. Thanks again.

- Mark
 
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