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Installing drywall on basement ceiling with open-web joists

Installing drywall on basement ceiling with open-web joists

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  #1  
Old 12-19-06, 11:02 PM
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Installing drywall on basement ceiling with open-web joists

Dear DIY,

I am in the process of finishing my basement and I will eventually have the task of drywalling our ceiling, which is structurally formed with open-web joists. These joists are composed with 2 2x4s cords on their "flats" running parallel to each other with metal triangular braces holding them together.

I plan on putting drywall immidiately beneath the joists, is there any issues if I screw the drywall directly to the bottom cord of the open-web floor joist?

Thanks,
Derek
 
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  #2  
Old 12-20-06, 03:42 AM
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Derek: No, you just have a larger target to hit than with regular framing. Makes for a much easier install. Quite often installing sheetrock on joists that aren't exactly parallel can make for an unhappy day. Yours can be off 1" or so, and you will still have a good solid screwing surface.
I know you may want a smooth finish on the ceiling, but have you thought about access to the utilities above this ceiling? Have you considered a drop in ceiling?
 
  #3  
Old 12-22-06, 08:38 PM
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Are open web joists too bouncy for a basement ceiling drywall finish

Thanks Chandler,

We have considered drop ceilings, but we are not fond of them though. We would prefer the drywall finish. However, the joists are a little bouncy. We will be eliminating or greatly reducing the bounce on one side of the basement because there will be a solid wall erected almost in the middle running perpendicular to the joists. However for the other half, the joists will still run the full 20' span without any support in the middle.

I hope that the plaster will be able to handle the vibrations. I also hope that the drywall screws will not affect the strength of the joists.

The other thing I am wondering is if there is a cross bracing solution that can be applied to the joists without negatively impacting other structural elements of the joists.

So far, I have not found too much info online about how to deal with open web joists.

Thanks,
Derek
 
  #4  
Old 12-22-06, 09:09 PM
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If enclosing your pipes, you might consider insulating the cold water pipes. Condensation can form on them, causing drips that will drip down and get drywall wet and cause water stains.
 
  #5  
Old 12-22-06, 09:44 PM
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Does PEX piping drip

I don't have copper piping for my water supply, I have this new PEX tubing. I have checked the cold water PEX tubes often and never felt moisture on them. My house is pretty dry to begin with, which I hope will change now that I have installed a humidifier on the furnace.

Do you think I should insulate this type of piping?

Derek
 
  #6  
Old 12-22-06, 09:51 PM
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According to Plastic Pipe Institute, PEX has low thermal transmission and is resistant to condensation. (www.plasticpipe.org)
 
  #7  
Old 12-23-06, 12:30 AM
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Basement drywall ceiling - few questions...

Thanks twelvepole,

I am still wondering whether the drywall after being mudded, will show cracks from the bouncy open web joists?

If so, is there a good way to cross brace open web joists?

And I am still wondering whether drywall screwes nstalled at the very bottom of every open wen joist would cause strcutural problems to the open-web joists.

Thanks,
Derek
 
  #8  
Old 12-23-06, 05:58 AM
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The only way you can jeopardize the integrity of the joisting is to cut into it. Driving sheetrock screws into them will not hurt them. You speak of bouncing, just how tall are the webs? 20' is not an inordinate span for the webs.
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-06, 08:25 AM
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The joists are about 18"-20" tall.

Any idea whether the bounce will pose a problem to the drywall seams?
 
  #10  
Old 12-23-06, 06:42 PM
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I have never seen bounce enough in a 20" beam to damage the sheetrock underneath. Now, not wanting to doubt you, but could you verify the "bounce"? Would it be possible for someone to verify if you have real bounce, or imagined bounce. You will hear noise from upstairs quite often, and will feel this in the room below. If the deflection is less than 1/8", then I would say you are ok. If it is more, you will have problems.
 
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