Stone Foundation Problem - Lifting Center Beam

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Old 11-26-07, 05:19 PM
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Stone Foundation Problem - Lifting Center Beam

I have an older (pre-1900) single story cabin with a hip roof (pyramid) - foot print is 22x28. I have 2 8x8 carrying beams that the floor joists run accross (they span 22ft) - The wooden support posts that hold the beam up are rotted and the 1st floor has settled about 4 inches on one beam and about 3 inches on the other. I poured 24x24x12 footings (4 for each beam - approx 5 ft distance between footing centers that im going to install new 8x8 PT posts on to support the beam...)

Some of my stone foundation walls are a bit rough - a few sections towards the base are bulging - the top 4 feet or so of the foundation looks good and the sill is level - (it is only like this in a couple of places, im still working on a fix for the walls). I suspect a brook behind the property may have flooded and heaved the foundation (Maine winters)

My question is - when I jack the center of the building - will it put more (or less) pressure on the foundation walls? I am thinking about installing temporary cribbing and beams as a secondary support for the house - but I had a contractor buddy tell me that the foundation is "already holding the house and since im not lifting the house off the sill - I should not need the expensive secondary support system" (cribbing) to jack the center of the building...
 
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Old 12-08-07, 07:14 PM
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Sounds like a lot of variables. How tall are these stone walls? Are the first floor walls also stone, or, wood frame? Stone dry-set, or, set in mortar? I don't know if I've got the right answers for you but I'm curious about your house!
Generally speaking, when you jack up a joist system that has dropped in the center, the joists will tend to exert force laterally against the bearing wall toward the outside. That's OK if they slide back into their places nicely, not OK if they push your wall out, or over, instead. There can be a lot of things that can bind them up while sliding back into place: tight stone pockets, sill plate or wall above, floor plank pushing wall from the inside, etc.. Even if you think you're OK, bracing against the outside is not a bad idea.

Steve
 
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Old 03-31-08, 11:17 AM
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We lifted the house

Sorry it took so long to reply - its been a fun filled Maine winter with about 100 inches of snow...

Anyway we took most of the dip out of the floor center - the house was gutted at the time and we used screw jacks to lift it - I installed 8x8 PT posts on 24x24 footings. The house feels so much better and a lot straighter.

Been waiting for the spring to attack my next basement issue - the bulging foundation walls. The basement has flooded before (brook out back) so I am considering backfilling the basement and converting it to a crawl space - over the winter we moved all utilities to the main house and the basement is just dead space - do you think its possible of feasible to backfill a foundation - should I repair the basement walls first? Any ideas?
 
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