best way to stop seepage on basement floor

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  #1  
Old 12-27-07, 09:08 AM
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best way to stop seepage on basement floor

I have some small seepage problems, but see zero visable cracks.

Currently my floor is covered with linolium stick down tiles and under the two layers of stick down linolium, I have what appears to be some very old concrete seeling product (it's a black, thick appears to be a latex type)

WHats the best way to seal my basement to keep moisture out.

Whats the easiest way to seal my basement to keep moisture out?

Whats the cheapest way?

what are the pro's / con's of each...

I have seen products like hydrallic cement for repairing cracks
and Sanitred for sealing the floor, but i don't see any cracks, and Im not confident that a solution like sanitred will withstand the pressure the floor is exposed to.

thanks for everybodys help
 
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Old 12-27-07, 09:28 AM
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First thing I'd do is grade the soil away from the house and put extra long downspouts on the gutters to run the roof water away from the house as well.
 
  #3  
Old 12-27-07, 10:00 AM
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It's been my experience that trying to prevent seepage from the inside is usually futile.The most common place for water to enter a basement is not through cracks (although slab cracks will allow seepage) but through the joint where the foundation walls meet the footer. Typically this joint is sealed during construction but over time the seal will fail.

The best way to keep water out of your basement is from the outside. Gutter extensions are probably the cheapest and easiest but may not be enough. Grading away from the foundation is also important but may get expensive. Depending on your lot it may not be practical. Grading can also be less effective if your soil is heavy clay. Clay drains very poorly.

Footer drains are very effective as are underslab drains. Both are very expensive to install. I had a bid of $4000 for underslab drains about 10 years ago. I'm sure it's at least twice that (or more) now.

Installing a sump to drain water away from under your slab may help. it's DIYable and fairly inexpensive - probably less than $300-$400.

IIWM I would probably install gutter extensions or gutter drains. I use gutter drains with buried corrogated pipe that routs rainwater nearly 100' away from my foundation.
 
  #4  
Old 12-27-07, 11:54 AM
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how do I repair that? should I use a hydralic cement? should I just get some kind of cauck and lay a really heavy cauck bead down?

I have drains in my basement floor, going into a sump, and i have a draintile system around the parimeter of the outside of the basement. I am not getting water on any of the walls, it appears just to be comming through the floor. Can I apply a sealer on the concrete to seal the floor?
 

Last edited by stickshift; 12-27-07 at 12:01 PM. Reason: Removed quoting of entire post
  #5  
Old 12-27-07, 01:24 PM
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best way to stop seepage on basement floor

Are you collecting any water in the drains that cause the sump pump to get rid of it? If is not running, your tile may not be working (plugged, collapsed).

cwbuff is correct since the floor to wall joint is a common source of leakage. Sealing during construction is usually not effective since the gap between the floor and the wall will increase in width as the slab cures over time. Opening the joint (dovetail shape) and forcing hydraulic cement (not portland cement) into the joint is a standard repair method. Forget about a goop of caulking.

You really should try to find out where the seepage is coming in and whether it may just be condensation.
 
  #6  
Old 12-28-07, 05:29 AM
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It seems to me that you may have a issue with your vapor barrier or the lack there of, since your not having any standing water in your basement, and you say there basically only moisture your speaking of to me that says there was never any vapor barrier laid down under the slab prior to the basement floor being poured.
 
  #7  
Old 12-28-07, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by DanW13 View Post
It seems to me that you may have a issue with your vapor barrier or the lack there of, since your not having any standing water in your basement, and you say there basically only moisture your speaking of to me that says there was never any vapor barrier laid down under the slab prior to the basement floor being poured.
this home is over 60 years old, so that is possible. How do you fix that from the inside? It does appear that I have a small crack inbetween the foundation and the walls, but vapor barrier could be part of the problem as well.
 
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