looking at new house with Radon

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Old 02-11-08, 07:48 AM
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looking at new house with Radon

I looked at a house to buy yesterday. it is a 2003 rebuilt house over a 1950 basement and foundation and addition over slab.
during the tour the sellers agent pointed out the radon mitigation system.

My question is how worried should I be about the radon?
Is the technology such that you maintain it properly and it is reliable enough that I shouldnt worry about it?

thanks,
 
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Old 02-11-08, 09:34 AM
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Have you done a radon test? Their is nothing to go bad but a $140.00 fan
 
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Old 02-11-08, 09:40 AM
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Thanks, but I'm more worried about the health concerns of having a radioactive cancer causing gas in the house than the cost of maintaining the mitigation system.
Is the technology proven good enough that once in place you wouldnt worry about having radon in the house or water?

Thanks again.
 
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Old 02-11-08, 12:49 PM
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http://www.epa.gov/radon/index.html

This site will give you insights concerning Radon. You will find most houses built after 2000 will have a passive radon mitigation system. The first reason for this is that radon gas is a natural occurring substance and can be found everywhere. The second reason is that new homes today are built very tight to meet Energy Code. These two by themselves pose very little threat to us. However if you combine the two the amount of radon measured in pCi/L (pico Curies per Liter) increases that we may be exposed to in our houses does pose a harmful risk to the occupants.

Installing a passive radon mitigation system in new construction usually cost considerably less than $200. or less than 1/4th what it would costs to do in already constructed homes. Considering the probability that radon may arise in homes today due to energy retrofits installing a passive radon mitigation system during construction of the new house is prudent. The presence of a passive radon mitigation system in a new home does not mean radon is present. Rather it means that the builder has considered the facts. Especially the fact that one cannot sell a house that has a 4 pCi/L or more. In other words the builder considers the costs for a passive radon mitigation system as an insurance policy.

Mr. Francis R. Lazaro
Radon Lic.# MET 11803
 
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Old 02-11-08, 12:56 PM
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Thanks for your repsonse. I've asked the sellers agent for more information about the radon mitigation system and whether it is there because there are elevated levels or if it is just an "insurance policy" as you put it. If its the later, then I'd consider it a selling feature, but if it was installed due to elevated levels, I am not sure I want to persue the house. That would be a shame because we love the house.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 12:51 PM
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we bought a house that was built in 2003 in 2007. We pulled an inspection on the house discovered high level of radon, around 11 pico curies (4 is acceptable). Had the seller install the system ($1200), and the readings were absolute zero, no more radon gas, none, zilch zero.

Installed correctly these systems are impeccable, and quite honestly better than a house that has acceptable levels between 1 & 4 PC with no system.

If you are concerned in the least have one installed and sleep soundly for the next 10-12 years before the fan dies, which is easy to replace.
 
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Old 02-12-08, 01:01 PM
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Wink

Id write it up on your bid for the home. That you are the seller get a company to give a bid on what it will take to put the vent fans and pi-pe work in to do the whole job on the home.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 06:40 AM
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Having worked in nuclear power for more than 25 years, my knowledge of things radioactive is better than most people. I firmly believe the whole radon issue is as big a scam as asbestos abatement.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 07:19 AM
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thanks for all your responses. After all this, the sellers agent just advised me that the 'system' that she pointed out as Radon Mitigation was in fact just a water filtration system for the well. and not for filtering radon from the water. They have tested for radon and none was detected. Great agent eh?
If we proceed and make an offer, I will have another radon test (air and water) done, but my guess is it will be fine.

Thanks again for all your responses and sorry for wasting your time.
Hopefully others who are concerned with the same issues, will find this post helpfull.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
Having worked in nuclear power for more than 25 years, my knowledge of things radioactive is better than most people. I firmly believe the whole radon issue is as big a scam as asbestos abatement.

A voice of reason. I was a qualified rad worker for nearly 20 years. It amazes me that people will lay on a beach for hours on end and then fret over radon gas.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 03:27 PM
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In my line of work the radiation fear is x-rays. I ask if they watch the food cooking in their microwave.
 
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Old 02-14-08, 07:37 AM
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My wife and I bought our ranch home 4 years ago. Tested for radon, short term test and it was 3,6 so the seller didn't have to mitigate since it was under 4. We live on a culm bank, shale, rock from coal. I bought an electronic radon tester to perform a long term test. After a month or 2, the level was at 6.5. We are in the process of finishing our basement. during this time, I applied 2 coats of DYLOK Extreme to the basement walls/cinder block, filled in any floor cracks with masonary caulk. Also used the drylok caulk/plug to fill in all spaces between the floor and the basement wall. Painted the flooring where we are going to have storage with drylok concrete paint. Started the radon test again... Short term, so far is 2.5 and falling.... So, in summary, by applying drylok, filling in any crakcs, etc., it reduced the radon levels from 6.5 to 2.5 and is is falling. 3 days ago it was at 2.8 now it is at 2.5....
 
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