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Basement framing done, some 2x4 studs are moving!

Basement framing done, some 2x4 studs are moving!


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Old 03-06-08, 05:28 AM
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Basement framing done, some 2x4 studs are moving!

My basement framing is complete and I noticed some of the 2x4 studs are 'twisted'. Is this ok???? Also, my electrician is over and said some of the 2x4s in the frame are 'loose' meaning they are moving!!!! I was down there to check and it seems like you can move it from side to side!!!! Now he has the outlet on that stud with the wires in them.

What are my options for this!! Any suggestions? I hope I don't have to take down the frrame or even the loose 2x4's. Any suggesstions on how to secure them so they don't move.. Also, what can I do with the 'twisted' stud(s).. are they ok?? Can drywall still attach?

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 03-06-08, 06:58 AM
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Studs

Toe-nail studs at bottom with 2 nails on each side.
You can attach drywall to warped studs, but the results may not look too good.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
Toe-nail studs at bottom with 2 nails on each side.
You can attach drywall to warped studs, but the results may not look too good.
Should I have the warped studs replaced? Is it hard to remove a stud and replace once it is already nailed to the bottom and top? I don't want my drywall not looking to good!

thanks
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:16 AM
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Wink

save yourself some grief and replace the studs!
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by mikeTN View Post
save yourself some grief and replace the studs!
Greif?? What kinda grief....

Is replacing them hard to do?!??! What needs to be done to replace? The entire wall frame doesn't have to come down? I hope not....
 
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Old 03-06-08, 07:40 AM
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The loose studs can be easily fixed with screws. I always do most of my framing with screws - it's way easier than toenailing.

As for replacing crooked studs, just cut them in half and pull them out.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk View Post
The loose studs can be easily fixed with screws. I always do most of my framing with screws - it's way easier than toenailing.

As for replacing crooked studs, just cut them in half and pull them out.
Awwww, sounds like an easy fix and an interesting idea about he screws!!! THANKS!!!
 
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Old 03-06-08, 12:37 PM
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If the twist is not too bad, you can straighten it with a little horizontal blocking. Toenail or screw any loose studs.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 01:40 PM
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If you decide to remove them, just use a reciprocating saw with a metal blade and cut through the nails at top and bottom. You may be able to use the 2x4 for fire blocking or elsewhere later in shorter pieces. The "grief" Mike was talking about was if you DIDN'T pull the studs prior to sheetrocking. Pulling them today is easy. Pulling them after the sheetrock bulges out due to an ill fitting stud ain't happy.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
If you decide to remove them, just use a reciprocating saw with a metal blade and cut through the nails at top and bottom. You may be able to use the 2x4 for fire blocking or elsewhere later in shorter pieces. The "grief" Mike was talking about was if you DIDN'T pull the studs prior to sheetrocking. Pulling them today is easy. Pulling them after the sheetrock bulges out due to an ill fitting stud ain't happy.
Guys,

Thank you very much for your input on this!!! Doesn't seem that bad to fix and has eased any of my concerns!!!
 
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Old 03-06-08, 03:22 PM
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Since you mentioned the electrician was there... and that wires are run, you probably don't want to remove any studs, so toenailing (or screwing) to fasten the studs will be your best bet. One well placed nail or screw to compensate for the twist will be helpful.

I'm guessing the electrician twisted a few boards loose while drilling holes with a forstner bit that was getting dull.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 04:11 PM
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To avoid this problem in future:

Never order from the lumberyard. All week, picky framers have been tossing bad studs off the stack, taking only good ones. Then to fill an order, yard workers gather up those same reject studs and truck them to you. Can you blame them? Better select each board yourself.

Buy lumber some days or even weeks before you begin framing. Stack the studs flatly, with some crosswise spacers for air circulation, where they'll dry a bit.

Warped and twisted boards are still viable for corners and top plates, by fighting them true against other boards. Or cut them short for small stuff.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Since you mentioned the electrician was there... and that wires are run, you probably don't want to remove any studs, so toenailing (or screwing) to fasten the studs will be your best bet. One well placed nail or screw to compensate for the twist will be helpful.

I'm guessing the electrician twisted a few boards loose while drilling holes with a forstner bit that was getting dull.
Very true...

Ignore my ignorance but, can you please tell me what toenailing means? Thanks!
 
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Old 03-06-08, 05:30 PM
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Hi,

Toenailing means to nail at an angle, through the stud, at the top and at the bottom. You are nailing through the stud, into the top plate or the sole plate. You'll find it easier to drill a pilot hole for your nail or screw to follow. Hold the stud in one hand, twisted into the position you want, while you drill or hammer with the other. If you're using screws, don't let go of the stud after drilling, just pick up your screw gun and set the screw.
 

Last edited by connie; 03-06-08 at 05:31 PM. Reason: can't spell worth a hoot!
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Old 03-06-08, 05:39 PM
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Ps...

Kobuchi gave you some excellent advice about lumber. It takes years to figure stuff like that on your own. I eventually learned what day the lumber truck would arrive at the store so I could get first pick.

Also, where Chris told you you could insert blocking, that means to cut a piece of 2x4 to insert between the studs.You screw or nail through the studs, into the block. If your studs are spread, you would cut the block a little shy, to take out the twist.
 
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Old 03-06-08, 06:00 PM
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You guys and girl (Connie) are awesome!! THANK YOU very much for all of your input and suggestions... It is MUCH APPRECIATED!!!!!!! Learned alot! THANKS!
 
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Old 03-13-08, 02:46 PM
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Follow-up....

What do you do when some of those studs that are bowed and the ones that are moving that already have holes and electrical wire running through them?
 
  #18  
Old 03-13-08, 03:22 PM
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If you're removing the bowed studs, and they already have electrical wire in them the easiest way it to unhook the wires in the plugs/switches (make sure the power is off first) and pull the wire out of the stud, install the new one then drill new holes and rerun the wiring.

If the studs are not bearing, then you could carefully cut out one side of the stud by the wire, so you could leave the wire in place and just remove the stud. Then cut out a notch in the new stud, and slide the wiring back into the notch. But this isn't really a good option for a couple of reasons, first of all if you are having an issue getting studs that are not warped, then cutting out the notches might let the new ones twist easier, and you would also have to be careful to secure the wire near the center of the stud, so you don't hit the wiring with any drywall screws.

If it were me, I'd pull out the wiring, then put it back after the studs have been replaced.
 
 

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