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Can I safely seal off my unfinished furnace room?

Can I safely seal off my unfinished furnace room?

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  #1  
Old 03-17-08, 11:31 AM
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Can I safely seal off my unfinished furnace room?

I finished my basement a couple years ago. My furnace sits in a small unfinished room in the basement. That room is currently uninsulated. I thought I might be able to make it a little more energy-efficient by putting some insulation up in the floor joists and on the back of the interior door that separates it from the finished room.

Is it safe/advisable/good practice to "seal" that room up? For instance, I would like to install a door sweep on that door as part of the effort, but I don't want to choke the furnace at all. Does the furnace get enough air from the returns?

Thanks.

note: cross-posted on the energy forum
 
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  #2  
Old 03-17-08, 11:55 AM
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Can I safely seal off my unfinished furnace room?

Your furnace usually gets its combustion air from the area it is in unless you have a fresh air supply to it.

If you can duct fresh air directly to your furnace, you will be saving energy and will not have to insulate.

The newer high efficenct furnaces have fresh air intakes. In my area, a fresh air intake has been required for years.
 
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Old 03-17-08, 01:32 PM
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Not to mention how the return air for the basement is handled. Do you have a return register dedicated for that purpose in your return duct system?
 
  #4  
Old 03-18-08, 08:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
Your furnace usually gets its combustion air from the area it is in unless you have a fresh air supply to it.

If you can duct fresh air directly to your furnace, you will be saving energy and will not have to insulate.

The newer high efficenct furnaces have fresh air intakes. In my area, a fresh air intake has been required for years.
It appears to have a fresh air duct connected to it. My father-in-law, who works for the gas company, is sure that our furnace would have one. So, perhaps Ohio has similar requirements.

My intention for insulating that unfinished room is to block heated air/air-conditioned air from escaping the finished rooms adjacent and above. Right now there is no insulation between the unfinished furnace room, and the finished family room above it, and the door leading to the finished part of the basement is only an interior door. That just doesn't seem efficient to me.
 
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Old 03-18-08, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Not to mention how the return air for the basement is handled. Do you have a return register dedicated for that purpose in your return duct system?
I contracted an HVAC pro to duct the basement when we finished it, and it does have a dedicated return.
 
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Old 03-18-08, 10:54 AM
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I dont think you would get much bang for your buck insulating this room. I would insulate any exterior walls in this room and leave it at that. If you move this room outside the building insulation envelope you'll then have to insulate the ductwork and maybe some of the plumbing. The only heat you are losing is going to the exterior. The heat escaping through the ceiling is helping heat the upstairs. What is the average temperature in the furnace room and the finished rooms?
 
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Old 03-18-08, 11:51 AM
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Wink

It appears to have a fresh air duct connected to it. My father-in-law, who works for the gas company, is sure that our furnace would have one. So, perhaps Ohio has similar requirements.
You dont say yes or no here if the furnace has make up air for sure or not. It has to have air from the out side or from the home for the furnace to be safe and work right. Like said dont put any insulation in the furnace room there any heat loss goes into the home. Might check and see that you have insulation up on the sill plate in each joist space. There you need it for sure.
 
  #8  
Old 03-19-08, 09:49 AM
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Unless furnace room is huge--you could insulate exterior walls
using i x 2 or 1 x 3 furring wood ( installed vertical ) w/ 3/4" foam board between. Cheap fix from big box.
 
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