Installing basement replacement windows

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-08-08, 09:12 AM
skydiverMN's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 84
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Installing basement replacement windows

I've read many of the previous posts regarding basement windows, and I too, want to install replacement 'hopper' style windows. It seems that my city requires me to have at least as much of an opening that exists with my current windows. This means that sealing it up with glass block is simply outta the question.

So where's my question? I'm not worried about finding a brand or type of window, as the big box types will have something, either in stock or special order for my needs. My question is this: How do you fasten the window to the concrete block of the foundation? I would think that you'd need some physical fastener attaching the window to the block vs. just having construction adhesive. Do I need to just drill through both and install a handful of concrete screws, then caulk around the inside/exterior joint?

Thanks!
SkydiverMN
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-08-08, 09:31 AM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 994
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You've pretty much got the idea. The hardest part (which in reality isn't all that hard) is getting the old windows out.

Must be some weird rules where you live. Why does the city care about the size of these windows? They're hardly for egress. I didn't even need a permit when I did it.
 
  #3  
Old 04-08-08, 09:37 AM
skydiverMN's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 84
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thumbs down Hey buddy, can I visit the bathroom w/o paperwork?

Not sure of WHY, but for replacement windows I will also require a permit! $25, and I can simply show up and get it. There's no inspection, etc. assuming I don't mess with the framing.

Here's the code:
1. The replacement window is the manufacturer's largest standard size window that will fit within the existing frame or existing rough opening. The replacement window shall be permitted to be of the same operating style as the existing window or a style that provides for a greater window opening area than the existing window;

They're just trying to keep it safe, I guess.
 
  #4  
Old 04-08-08, 10:40 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Your existing windows probably (though not certainly) have a wooden framework currently. You can remove the existing window from the framework and attach the new one to the framework from the old window...
 
  #5  
Old 04-08-08, 12:23 PM
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 994
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by thezster View Post
Your existing windows probably (though not certainly) have a wooden framework currently. You can remove the existing window from the framework and attach the new one to the framework from the old window...
Definitely not "certainly." Mine were metal framed and cemented into the wall. But still not too hard to remove.
 
  #6  
Old 04-10-08, 07:19 AM
skydiverMN's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 84
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Most certainly not certainly...

My windows are metal framed and jammed right into the blocks. No wood exists to fasten the replacement to...

Here's what I'm gonna do. It seems mostly intuitive, but please tell me if I'm missing something or if you have a better way of dealing with it.
  1. [*]
  2. [*]
  3. [*]
  4. [*]
  5. [*]
  6. [*]

So what did I miss?

Thanks!
 
  #7  
Old 04-10-08, 07:59 AM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'd have a beer to celebrate rather than a cup of coffee... but that's just me...

I would also make a change and install a wooden framework to the window area... When you drill into concrete, the bit tends to wander often, ruining your carefully spotted holes in the window frame... But, that's just me... Yes, I read the code requirements, but would bet the permit office would have no issue with re-framing the opening.
 
  #8  
Old 04-11-08, 02:03 PM
skydiverMN's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 84
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
wood border and a beer

Okay, I can add a wood frame, but the window isn't very big to begin and I don't think there's room for a treated 2x4 surround. Other windows that I've seen use a 3/4" wood frame, but what species should I use? 1 of the 3 windows that's going to get replaced is below grade, the others are just a wee bit above. Do they make 3/4" treated, or is this not a concern?

Thanks.

 
  #9  
Old 04-11-08, 03:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,268
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You should be able to purchase 1X treated lumber at any big box store/lumberyard...
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: