Basement Support Posts

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  #1  
Old 04-16-08, 07:36 PM
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Basement Support Posts

I just changed out 4 6x6 support posts in my basement. I used doug fir (green wood). They are starting to crack. I'm wondering if this is ok or should I change them out with other posts??
 
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  #2  
Old 04-17-08, 03:06 AM
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Good morning,

How did you replace the supports...cut the new ones short and then shimmed into position? Is there a metal plate atop the post to spread the weight distribution? How is the base of the post anchored? Why did you swap the posts in the first place? Did you consider using steel lalley columns?

See how this works? You ask me one question, I ask you five

If the wood was green, it is possible the cracks are just from drying, but because there is such a potential for serious disaster, I'd get an opinion from a professional on site.

Connie
 
  #3  
Old 04-17-08, 05:28 AM
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Posts in Basement

Well, to get the posts out I had to place jacks on either side of the posts to remove them. They were quite easy to remove because they were rotten. I'd post a pic if I could. TERMITES!!!! There were also no footings to speak of. One of the posts was sitting on two red bricks. The house is a 1919 special. Before installing the new posts I dug a 2ft x 2ft hole where each post would be sitting and poured 500lbs of 5000psi cement into each hole. I also reinforced each footing with a rebar framed structure. also I embedded Simpson strong ties into the cement for earthquake. On top between the post and the beam I did not put a metal plate, but I did tie the top of the post to the beam. Now the posts are cracking in the middle of the posts.
 
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Old 04-17-08, 06:43 PM
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Oh, I think you need a structural engineer. You can probably get some assistance from your city or county building code departments.

It sounds like you did a great job with footers for the posts. If you still have the temp posts, I'd put them back in to help support the joists until you get a solid answer as to what is required to become stable.

Someone else may come along with a better reply, but if I were you, I'd be looking for a structural engineer tomorrow.

Connie
 
  #5  
Old 04-17-08, 10:21 PM
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So, for those of you reading through. I found the answer to my problem. Actually there is nothing wrong. I found out that "Green Wood" which is also non-kiln dried wood has about 15% or less water left in it. In other words it still has to dry. So the cracks that I'm see are a phenomena called "Checking". Not anything serious. The structural integrity of the wood is still retained. These breaks in the wood that I'm seeing are a result of the outer layer of the wood drying faster than the inner layer. Thus causing small cracks on the outer layer of the beam.
 
  #6  
Old 04-17-08, 10:58 PM
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With deep checking, your 6x6 becomes something like a bundle of 2x2s. You might want to nail that together before the douglas fir turns to iron.

The wood will only shrink ~0.2% in length.

The checking isn't inevitable, so I'd say it is "wrong". You can stack green lumber in an environment where it dries very slowly, straight and solid. Many good reasons why people seldom do that, though.
 
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Old 04-18-08, 02:53 AM
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Good Morning,

I still think an inspection is in order. Trying to diagnose a problem like this via the internet is akin to me trying to perform
surgery, long distance, using a stand-in.

I did say in my first response that it could be the wood drying-
BUT you still should get a professional opinion.

(And, what if we're wrong...I'd prefer not to take that chance.)

Connie
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-08, 05:23 AM
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It's a sign of the times. Not to be mean, but there is so much information out there now. It just takes a little research to figure things out if you put your mind to it.
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-08, 05:44 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions. Think I'll be passing on the "Pros". I know the posts I installed will not be coming out or falling. All of them are bolted to the ground with two 5/8" 8" long bolts per post attached to the simpson strong tie that's imbedded in 500lbs of cement in the floor. The tops are attached to the support beam above by simpson strong ties also. Like I said in one of my posts before, I wish I could post a pic. It's actually overkill for what a "Pro" would do.
 
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Old 04-18-08, 03:56 PM
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You can post a picture...Upload your photo. (Use Picasa if you have a Google account, it's so easy...or photobucket is a great host, too.) Post the link or insert the picture, using the "insert"
button. It's right above where we type and has a sun and a mountain for an icon.

Connie
 
  #11  
Old 04-19-08, 08:15 AM
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base of post picture (first try at posting a pic)

 
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