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Remediation of rotting wooden basement slab 2x4 forms

Remediation of rotting wooden basement slab 2x4 forms

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  #1  
Old 05-30-08, 09:23 AM
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Remediation of rotting wooden basement slab 2x4 forms

I recently purchased a home. It started in the 60s as an A-frame with crawlspace, but a two-story addition with walk-out basement was added in 1976. I believe the addition was built by the homeowner. Unfortunately, the basement slab for the walk-out basement was built somewhat unconventionally. It appears to have been built as a grid of 2x4 boards on gravel filled individually with cement.

A later owner of the property made an effort to finish the basement space by adding drywall and carpet; they put down a waterproof pad and then carpeting on the slab.

Pulling up the carpeting and padding reveals the original slab and the exposed ends of the wooden forms, which have rotted to a soft black mess, easily dislodged by a screwdriver. Almost needless to say, fungus is visible on the underside of the padding and the remnants of the wood.

My intent is to dispose of the carpeting and padding and somehow remediate the rotting wood. My first instinct is to pull, scrape, and/or chisel it all out and fill the gaps between the subslabs with some kind of cement, possibly hydraulic, one section at a time.

Would hydraulic cement be an appropriate choice, or would it pose lateral compression issues with the sections of slab? Or should I be thinking about an entirely different approach?

As for the surrounding soils, the house is over fractured granite, the soils are generally dry; the original crawlspace has an earthen floor that is completely dry. I suspect the slab walk out section is mainly damp because the gutters were dumping water at the base of the foundation walls and spring snow meltoff...
 
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  #2  
Old 05-30-08, 03:34 PM
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Dick may chime in here shortly with better advice, but hydraulic cement would be horribly expensive to use in such a large quantity. It would seem if 3000 or 5000 lb concrete were used in the cleaned holes, you may escape problems. But wait on concrete experts, as I am just a nail driver.
 
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Old 06-03-08, 10:41 PM
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They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Here goes:



You can see part of the basement slab, with the embedded wood. It's approximately a 2.5ft x 8ft grid of slabs.
 
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Old 06-04-08, 05:37 AM
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Talking

Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Dick may chime in here shortly with better advice, but hydraulic cement would be horribly expensive to use in such a large quantity. It would seem if 3000 or 5000 lb concrete were used in the cleaned holes, you may escape problems. But wait on concrete experts, as I am just a nail driver.

c'mon Chandler! JUST a nail driver! you mean that this arthritis and joint pain from a 22 oz. Estwing doesn't count?

i do agree that a CONCRETE MAN needs to sign on this. WHAT A MESS!
 
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Old 06-04-08, 03:47 PM
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Hey, Mike, the only thing I use my 22 oz estwing for nowadays is board alignment. Bostitch, Paslode, PC and others have made swinging part of the past. Now, I only have torn rotator cuffs from lifting the stupid things above my head. Or should I have worded it lifting the things, stupidly, over my head? I sent a PM to Dick, so maybe he will chime in here.
 
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Old 06-05-08, 04:15 PM
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Smile

aren't pneumatic tools wonderful??? wish i had had them earlier on. too late for the shoulders, etc..
 
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