Above garage room (how do I get heat out)

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Old 06-23-08, 03:06 PM
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Above garage room (how do I get heat out)

I bought a home 2 years ago which has a above garage room they added on. The room has 2 vents going to it which seem to move a fair amount of air into them. The air is cool and seems to have a fair amount of velocity. There is no return in the room and the hot air isn't getting pulled out. Please give me advice on how to pull the air out. I'll post better pictures when I get home of the room.





The wall to the left of the plant has a vent about 3/4 up the wall. That is where the other vent is.

These are pics of the previous owners stuff excuse the mess.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 03:32 PM
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For air to flow, there must be a supply and a return path, as you seem to understand. I am assuming the other rooms in the hosue have returns?? If there is no return path in the room, the system will suck the air from room any way it can. Likely under a door. If there is little or no gap under the door, you need to make a vent in the door. Ideally, a system should have equal flow into/out-of a room, the only way to properly do that is to add a return path from the room. That can get complicated, in an addition.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 03:35 PM
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Well, I'm not so much a home improvement specialist or ventilation expert, but I have built a number of PCs and positive air pressure with adequate ventilation does better at evacuating the heat than negative air pressure.

IOW, having an intake fan blow into the case and having openings for the air to leave does better than having an outake fan sucking the hot air out and having holes for outside ait to come in.

If it's the same for you're attic space, and since hot air rises, you'll need a vent up high, weather shielded and all. Perhaps roof vents would serve you best.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 04:04 PM
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Looks like the return air can just go down the steps to main part of the home. If this is the case then return is fine and you need more supply.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 04:17 PM
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Oh, did we see this back in the old neighborhood.. The cathedral ceilings mean not much insulation and airflow in the attic above. That radiant heat will kill ya. The folks that had the bonus room above the garages back there, almost all had to either put in window units or have more zoned ducting and bigger A/C units put in.

I don't see one, but a ceiling fan may mix the air so it flows down the stairs a bit better, and at least you'd have some air movement. With the supplies down low like that, the warmer air will tend to rise and not get recirculated thru the system, is that right Pro dudes?
 
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Old 06-23-08, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by robert_s View Post
Well, I'm not so much a home improvement specialist or ventilation expert, but I have built a number of PCs and positive air pressure with adequate ventilation does better at evacuating the heat than negative air pressure.

IOW, having an intake fan blow into the case and having openings for the air to leave does better than having an outake fan sucking the hot air out and having holes for outside ait to come in.

If it's the same for you're attic space, and since hot air rises, you'll need a vent up high, weather shielded and all. Perhaps roof vents would serve you best.
I have I believe they are called powered attic vents in the attic which turn on when the attic gets a certain size. Are you suggesting I add one to that room. Sorry I'm confused. I don't know much about HVAC I just know that cool air is getting in but the hot air isn't being pulled out.

Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
For air to flow, there must be a supply and a return path, as you seem to understand. I am assuming the other rooms in the hosue have returns?? If there is no return path in the room, the system will suck the air from room any way it can. Likely under a door. If there is little or no gap under the door, you need to make a vent in the door. Ideally, a system should have equal flow into/out-of a room, the only way to properly do that is to add a return path from the room. That can get complicated, in an addition.

The room looks like it was a linen closet that had a door on it which was attached to a laundry room. I took that door off hoping to improve flow and that did nothing. Also keeping the door leading into of the laundry room doesn't help.

Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Oh, did we see this back in the old neighborhood.. The cathedral ceilings mean not much insulation and airflow in the attic above. That radiant heat will kill ya. The folks that had the bonus room above the garages back there, almost all had to either put in window units or have more zoned ducting and bigger A/C units put in.

I don't see one, but a ceiling fan may mix the air so it flows down the stairs a bit better, and at least you'd have some air movement. With the supplies down low like that, the warmer air will tend to rise and not get recirculated thru the system, is that right Pro dudes?
Unfortunately a ceiling fan isn't an option because of the low ceilings. The highest point in the room is about 6ft 6inches. The room is a video game room for my kids so they have no problem with the low ceilings. Heating isn't a big issue in the winter because I just use a small space heater.
 
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Old 06-23-08, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by 94SupraTT View Post
I have I believe they are called powered attic vents in the attic which turn on when the attic gets a certain size. Are you suggesting I add one to that room. Sorry I'm confused. I don't know much about HVAC I just know that cool air is getting in but the hot air isn't being pulled out.
do you feel up to installing new ducting into the wall? You'd need it up high rathen than down low.
 
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