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Replacing Corroded Crawlspace Ledger Board Fasteners

Replacing Corroded Crawlspace Ledger Board Fasteners

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  #1  
Old 07-22-08, 12:50 AM
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Question Replacing Corroded Crawlspace Ledger Board Fasteners

Hi,

I have a 4x6 beam in my crawlspace that is supported by a 2x6 ledger board secured to a foundation wall by fasteners that appear to be large nails with fender washers. Unfortunately this tight dirt crawlspace has been subjected to standing water for years and I am worried these fasteners have become compromised by corrosion. I was thinking of boring through the ledger board and into the wall so I could insert threaded rod and epoxy them into the wall. I would then secure the ledger board with washers and nuts. Is this a proper approach, or is there a better method.

Thanks for taking the time to read my post and consider my questions.



 
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  #2  
Old 07-22-08, 06:25 AM
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Nice photos. The ledger board in the first pic shows it sitting on a concrete ridge. I don't think it's going anywhere. The most I would do is get a Hilti shot gun and shoot a few shots through it.
 
  #3  
Old 07-22-08, 08:48 AM
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Hi Pulpo,

Thanks for the compliment.

There is no concrete ridge. The 4 corroded pins are the only items supporting the ledger board.

Here is a picture of the other end of the 4x6 beam attached to the front retaining wall using the same method.



Howard
 
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Old 07-22-08, 04:39 PM
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I would still use a Hilti shot gun. You can shoot 5 or 10 of them in there. That's the quickest, easiest and cheapest way to go.
 
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Old 07-23-08, 04:03 AM
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Must have been a big coffee day for the inspector that day, and the builder and the architect. There should be something more substantial than that under that beam. Not much room for digging, but there should be a footer and some blocks under the beam ends. I would certainly not rely on a few Hilti pins.
 
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Old 07-23-08, 05:05 AM
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I am not a contractor, but I thought the use of these so-called Hilti pins was not sufficient for this application. That is why I was thinking of using threaded rod with bolts. How about concrete wedge connectors? NOTE: I am in a seismic area.

BTW, when we opened up the adjacent firewall to inspect for mold I think we found the reason for the poor construction. This one must have belonged to the building inspector.

 
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Old 07-23-08, 05:31 AM
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Just for starters:

IRC R606.13 Beams, girders or other concentrated loads supported by a wall or column shall have a bearing of at least 3 inches in length measured parallel to the beam upon solid masonry not less than 4 inches in thickness, or upon a metal bearing plate of adequate design and dimensions to distribute the load safely, or upon a continuous reinforced masonry member projecting not less than 4 inches from the face of the wall.
 
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Old 07-24-08, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Michael Thomas View Post
Just for starters:

IRC R606.13 Beams, girders or other concentrated loads supported by a wall or column shall have a bearing of at least 3 inches in length measured parallel to the beam upon solid masonry not less than 4 inches in thickness, or upon a metal bearing plate of adequate design and dimensions to distribute the load safely, or upon a continuous reinforced masonry member projecting not less than 4 inches from the face of the wall.
Hi Mike,

Thank you for your input. This property was built in the early 80s and I am not sure what the IRC or CA code required back then, but from what you posted, it does not appears that a wooden ledger is permitted by the current IRC for this application. What do you recommend?

Howard
 
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Old 07-24-08, 05:59 PM
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It may be that a ledger board was permitted at the time of the construction but a footing may be required now. If I understand you correctly, you were looking for the best option as far as the structure goes, not so much the code.

Nothing beats a 3 foot deep by 12 inch diameter cement footing with a 4x4 up to the header. As close as you can come to that is the best option but probably one of the most difficult considering the limited work space.
 
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Old 07-25-08, 01:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Pulpo View Post
It may be that a ledger board was permitted at the time of the construction but a footing may be required now. If I understand you correctly, you were looking for the best option as far as the structure goes, not so much the code.

Nothing beats a 3 foot deep by 12 inch diameter cement footing with a 4x4 up to the header. As close as you can come to that is the best option but probably one of the most difficult considering the limited work space.
Pulpo,

I have searched many places going back 20 years and cannot find a reference to using a ledger board, especially one only 1-1/2 inches thick, to secure a beam/girder to a masonry wall. I see they used the proper hanger on the adjacent beam/girder in the photo below.



For attaching to the front retaining wall they should have used the equivalent to the Simpson LGUM.

http://www.strongtie.com/products/co...UM_MASONRY.asp



I most likely will just add concrete fasteners to supplement the so-called Hilti pins.

Thanks,

Howard
 
  #11  
Old 07-25-08, 06:29 PM
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Yea, that's probably all you need. As corroded as the pins may look, I bet the ledger boards are still secure.
 
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