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Water dripping from Heat/Air Conditioning vents in home

Water dripping from Heat/Air Conditioning vents in home

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Old 08-24-08, 11:50 AM
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Water dripping from Heat/Air Conditioning vents in home

Hoping for some guidance.
We live on the Florida gulf. In the summertime, we have a number of air conditioning vents dripping a fair amount of water (enough to soak a rag if placed underneath). One vent is beginning to show sign's of water damage on the surrounding drywall.
Being this is Florida, we've no basement, all the ductwork runs through the attic. The main unit is in a closet in the laundry room. The problem isn't there in the winter time, where the temperatures here might be in the 70's as opposed to summertime 90's, and the humidity is a bit lower.
Any help on what we should be looking for as the cause is greatly appreciated.
Thanks much.
 
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Old 08-24-08, 01:30 PM
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Welcome to the forums! Several factors need to be looked at. First restricted air flow over the a coil. Monthly filter replacement is necessary, and cleaning of the coil yearly will ensure good air flow. All the condensation should take place in this area and the condensation taken away via the 3/4" drain pipe, either by gravity to a floor drain or a condensate pump to the outside. Poor supply line insulation will cause humidity to be turned into water, so a visual inspection of your supply lines, their connections at the terminations and at the plenum chamber may reveal gaps where warm air could infiltrate.
 
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Old 08-24-08, 01:59 PM
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Thanks.

When you talk about supply line are you referring to the ductwork itself?

I just did some additional digging and it appears to be coming through the insulation around the outside of the ductwork. Being where we are, hot and humid, condensation wouldn't be surprising in the least (and what I suspected).

Am I looking at just beefing up the insulation around where the ductwork goes into the ceiling, do I need to check for some sort of vapor barrier or is it more involved?

Just additional description of the layout, there is a larger main feed, hanging from the roof joists, that runs the length of the house and then seperate smaller ducts come off that to the separate rooms. This is a ranch style house.

Again, thanks again for the input.
 
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Old 08-26-08, 11:09 AM
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You can beef up the insulation, but you have to keep hot air from getting to the cooler pipe, so be sure to tape it really good at all seams, using metal tape.
 
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Old 09-02-08, 02:14 PM
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We had this problem because the pipes were stopped up

We had this problem and it was the first time I'd ever seen anything like it. The main vent opening in our living room was "pouring". I turned the A/C off and it emptied itself and dried out. When I turned it back on it started leaking again. Clearly here I don't know the lingo, but we called our A/C guy and he came out and checked for anything that was stopped up and found that the pipe that some part of the unit was attached to (in our half bath downstairs) was clogged. Apparently the pipe was where the unit was hooked up to drain this water, so it had no place to go but out the ventilation covers. He cleared it (and all this black stuff came out of the drain and splattered all over the bathroom) and we have not had the problem again. I don't know if it's the same issue or not, but worth a shot, right?
 
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Old 09-02-08, 04:26 PM
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If properly installed, the condensate drain line will have a removable cap prior to the trap into which you should pour a little bleach occasionally in order to keep the black stuff down.
 
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