Hanging Paneling directly on Studs

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Old 09-24-08, 05:31 PM
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Hanging Paneling directly on Studs

We are looking to finish our basement on a tight budget in the next 2 months. We have tossed around all of our options and I'm trying to get information on the less expensive options we have come across. Our basement is mostly dry with a small amount of leakage on one exterior wall. It only leaks during heavy rains and it comes in where the house sits on the foundation. Currently we have framed the walls in with steel studs placed on top of plastic sheeting. We planned to drywall the walls and do a drop ceiling but today we've been tossing around the idea of paneling. We looked at several different paneling options and I personally would prefer to do this. We have a small house and the mess of drywalling would drive me crazy. It would also be an issue with our cats who pretty much live in the basement - as well as our laundry room that houses all of our clothes. I know we could do it much quicker if we just hung paneling as well.

My questions:
Can you properly hang (glue) paneling to steel studs? How?

How likely are we to have issues with bowing between the studs (16")?

What should we be sure to consider when choosing a paneling?

Is there any reason you would strongly recommend NOT using paneling?

Any other information would be much appreciated. Thank you.
 
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Old 09-24-08, 06:22 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

You need to resolve the moisture issue before you cover up the foundation wall!!!

Most paneling sold today needs to be installed over a backer [drywall/plywood] it isn't stout enough to support it's self between studs. There is paneling that can be installed directly to the framing but you have to hunt for it - it will cost more.

I'm not sure how would be the best way to attach paneling to steel studs - maybe construction adhesive and screws.

Also any cuts made with paneling need to be spot on - you can't go back and fix any mistakes like you can with drywall, mud and tape.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 04:34 AM
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I agree with Marksr, in that you must backer the paneling. Even 3/8" beadboard panels will warp between stud bays in basements where moisture is more difficult to control. It would be not to expensive to go ahead and install drywall on the studs using self tapping drywall screws, omit finishing of course, and glue the panels to the drywall. And, as stated, make sure your cuts are right on, or things won't be happy. If your ceiling is in place, make all your measurements for receptacle/switch boxes from the ceiling and the last panel edge. Don't worry about the bottom as it will vary and you will cover it with base trim.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 11:22 AM
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Thanks guys - I appreciate your input. My husband came home last night and had come to the same conclusion - that we should adhere the paneling on top of unfinished drywall. We just don't have the time to mess with finishing drywall, nor do I want the mess of it. We are unsure exactly where the water comes from for sure. We are going to do our best to seal up the outside of our house but we can't be sure it will work - and we can't afford to hire this out. It is for this reason that my husband has hung sheeting behind the studs so that the walls stay dry. We will also run, for precautionary reasons, a dehumidifier in the basement. We will use mildew resistant drywall as well. For flooring we are planning on a 2 in 1 (pad attached) wood laminate flooring. Should we seal the floor that we've never had water problems with - I'm thinking no? Do you see any major problems with what we are planning to do? If I need to answer question - just ask. We are also planning to insulate between the plastic sheeting and drywall.
 
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Old 09-25-08, 01:42 PM
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I'd be leary of closing up the wall with the leak or installing flooring until I was convinced the problem was solved.
 
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Old 09-28-08, 08:50 PM
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Drywall will be less expensive than paneling.

Drywall is like $5 a sheet, compare that to paneling. Its not hard to mud and tape it, espiceially if you run the joints vertically from floor to ceiling. Seam joints are much easier to get a smooth finsih compared to butt joints.

Search you tube for drywall mud ant tape videos. Some good instructional one out there.
 
 

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