additional sump pit installation


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Old 01-10-09, 08:36 AM
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additional sump pit installation

I need an additional sump pit installed in my basement. I currently have a sump pit with a 1/3 HP Champion sump pump and a Zoeller Aquanot back-up pump with battery back-up. The plumber gave me a price for the following:

He will install a new sump pit adjacent to my existing one and connect the two basins via pipe. He will install the same set up I currently have except he will use a Zoeller M53 sump pump for the new pit and also replace the existing Champion pump I have in the existing sump pit. He will install quiet type check valves on the new sump piping and replace the existing check valves with quiet type on the existing sump pump piping. He will run 2" pvc discharge piping from the new sump pump and tee up with the existing sump pump 2" discharge. He will also reconfigure my exisitng piping and properly secure them to my basement wall. He quoted me a price of $4,450.00 dollars. Does this sound like it's in the ball park?

Thanks.

Danny
 
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Old 01-10-09, 09:57 AM
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First, why do you need a second sump pit? The equipment you have sounds pretty good. Secondly, unless the new pumps your guy is planning on using are really expensive, or you live in Beverly Hills, his price sounds a little rich. I have had plumbers rough a house for less.
 
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Old 01-10-09, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Craig 845 View Post
First, why do you need a second sump pit? The equipment you have sounds pretty good. Secondly, unless the new pumps your guy is planning on using are really expensive, or you live in Beverly Hills, his price sounds a little rich. I have had plumbers rough a house for less.
The inspector's report I received when I bought my house about 5 months ago recommended a second sump pit. Also, I found out when we recently had a melt off of about 12-18" of snow in one day my emergency back-up pump alarm starting going off every minute or two. The main pump could not handle the water flow and the back-up pump was kicking in to help. I live in northern Illinois. As I had mentioned. The main pump the plumber will install is a Zoeller M53. I went on line and found out the pump only costs $150. As I have figured it, the materials would cost around $1200 - $1300 max. That includes two Zoeller M53 main pumps, one Zoeller Aquanot back-up pump with battery back-up, four quiet check vavles, a sump basin, 2" pvc piping and miscellaneous clamps and fittings. What do plumbers get an hour? $125? How long would it take? 8 hours? How many men? Two? If my estimate is correct it would cost $1300 in material and $2000 in labor. That would make the total $3300.
 
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Old 01-10-09, 02:44 PM
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You definitely have a major league water situation. Adding more pumping capacity takes care of the water in your basement but not the the ultimate problem which is why is it in there in the first place? Before I dropped thousands of dollars on more pumping, I would explore trying to fix the problem itself by identifying where your water is getting in. Your money may be better spent on waterproofing your foundation, adding footing drains, adding a swale around the house, etc. to keep the water out entirely.
 
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Old 01-10-09, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Craig 845 View Post
You definitely have a major league water situation. Adding more pumping capacity takes care of the water in your basement but not the the ultimate problem which is why is it in there in the first place? Before I dropped thousands of dollars on more pumping, I would explore trying to fix the problem itself by identifying where your water is getting in. Your money may be better spent on waterproofing your foundation, adding footing drains, adding a swale around the house, etc. to keep the water out entirely.
My basement is dry. I have drainage tiles both inside and outside my foundation walls. My sump basin has inlets from the outside drainage tiles and the inside drainage tiles. The inside inlet pipes never have water entering the sump basin. The water coming into my sump is from the outside drainage tiles. My property is graded well. everything slopes away from my home and into swales that run along the front and side of my home. I only need more pumping capacity during a major rain storm or as I mentioned before a same day melt off of 12" - 18" of snow. I was thinking of just increasing my main pump size from 1/3 HP to 1/2 HP. That would increase the GPM at 10' head from 40gpm to 61 gpm. I think that would do it since my current main pump discharges 40 gpm and my back-up 36 gpm.
 
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Old 01-10-09, 05:31 PM
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you will need to take in to acount the size of the discharge piping also, next where does the discharge go to? it should not go to the sanitary sewer but as far from the house as possible to avoid recharging the existing drain lines. I would see no reason for a second sump if the first with a larger pump is feasible.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
 
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Old 01-12-09, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Speedwrench View Post
you will need to take in to acount the size of the discharge piping also, next where does the discharge go to? it should not go to the sanitary sewer but as far from the house as possible to avoid recharging the existing drain lines. I would see no reason for a second sump if the first with a larger pump is feasible.

life begins when the kids leave home and the dog dies
I have a 2" discharge pipe. The plumber that gave me a quote said the pipe is more than adequate . Most discharges are 1 1/2". The discharge pipe empties outside into an underground 4" black solid flexible pipe that is routed away from the house. I don't know its routing, but I think it probably goes to a swale about 50' from my home or to the back yard about a 150'. My grade slopes down to the side and back of my home. I want to have a new 4" rigid schedule 40 pvc pipe installed underground from the sump discharge to the farthest point in my back yard (170'). The plumber quoted me a price of $4800. This seems way out of line to me.
 
 

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