Wood vs Metal Studs???


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Old 07-27-09, 09:17 AM
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Wood vs Metal Studs???

I am adding partition walls in my basement for the sole purposed of hanging pegboard and a shelving storage system. Should I use wood or metal studs?

If I went with wood, I would use pretreated for the floor plate and then untreated for the ceiling plate and studs.

Would metal be strong enough to hang pegboard on and a wall shelving system? Ive never worked with that material so how easy is it?

In terms of equipment, I have a air compressor and was planning on buying a framing gun for this project and others around the house. I know I need a powder-actuated gun for the floor plate for either material. With the metal studs is there any special equpiment other then sheet metal cutters?
 
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Old 07-27-09, 11:21 AM
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Unless you put in blocking for the metal..you are probably better off going with wood. One prob is the thin wall of the stud doesn't give anything for the screws to bite into, so you need something behind it.

Will you be putting up drywall on the the studs?
 
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Old 07-27-09, 02:37 PM
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I agree with GG, but if you choose to go with a slat wall, the metal studs would suffice, provided you covered them first with sheetrock or other material. Then the slat wall would lay flat and you can hang just about anything within reason on it.
 
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Old 08-02-09, 07:28 AM
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You could use tapcon anchoring screws for the floor plate or anchor nails. You only need a hammer drill (or you could get away with a regular drill if there's only a few holes).

Why the treated plate? If you have a water problem, it's going to come into contact with drywall, or pegboards as well, or metal studs. You're better off fixing any water problems first.
 
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Old 08-02-09, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by johnnation View Post
Why the treated plate? If you have a water problem, it's going to come into contact with drywall, or pegboards as well, or metal studs. You're better off fixing any water problems first.
Around my area a treated bottom plate is required on top of any concrete.
 
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Old 08-02-09, 09:16 AM
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Tolyn -

I think requirement is for any concrete in contact with the soil. On a 2 to 50 story building, there is no problem with concrete since it is not in contact with damp concrete unless there are more important problems.

Sort of like the mercury scares where they now evacuate a school because a thermometer breaks. When I took chemistry in high school, the teacher gave everyone a sample of mercury to play with and understand the properties. It was fun and neat stuff, but made a mess out of your class ring. You also had to have test tube to put it back into when didn't need it.

Dick
 
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Old 08-02-09, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
I think requirement is for any concrete in contact with the soil. On a 2 to 50 story building, there is no problem with concrete since it is not in contact with damp concrete unless there are more important problems.
Correct. The OP posted that it is a basement so I assumed that it is a house and in contact with the earth.
 
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Old 08-05-09, 02:17 PM
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I would never use steel studs in a basement. Moisture/rust. They way we do it on the job site is use a roll of foam sill insul under the treated plate. Then reg wood studs. My question is this going to be insulated and thats the real miss here. If so then a plate and stud wall is a no no, We use blue foam board then flat 2bs. No plate. Hears is how to Properly insulate a basement wall and floor for that matter. YouTube - Best way to insulate a basement 800x600
 
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Old 08-27-09, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by 21boat View Post
I would never use steel studs in a basement. Moisture/rust. They way we do it on the job site is use a roll of foam sill insul under the treated plate. Then reg wood studs. My question is this going to be insulated and thats the real miss here. If so then a plate and stud wall is a no no, We use blue foam board then flat 2bs. No plate. Hears is how to Properly insulate a basement wall and floor for that matter. YouTube - Best way to insulate a basement 800x600
Surely these metal studs are all galvinized?

I do know that at least when I checked home depot this week they were going for around $4.50/pop vs $1.97 for wood studs. Also, they are structurally weak unless beefed up with wood in between them (so then why bother) or drywalled. Considering you're specifically building these to take a load, I bet wood is better.
 
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Old 08-27-09, 10:39 AM
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Wood vs Metal Studs???

Galvanizing is just a surface coating that can be easily destroyed.

A screw or nail as an attachment method will destroy the galvanizing at the most critical point. Screws shave the galvanizing off the steel and also off themselves (if galvanizied) as they are used The connection may be gone and all you have is pristine wrinkled tin stud with hole where it was attached.

Dick
 
 

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