Sweating Ceramic floor in basement. Now what?

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  #1  
Old 08-24-09, 12:21 PM
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Sweating Ceramic floor in basement. Now what?

Hi all.

I am in a walk-out basement bungalow. The basement floor is all ceramic tile laid straight on the cement floor. No barrier. On hot & humid days, the floor sweats like crazy and becomes wet all over. A stand alone dehumidifier cannot keep up. I have no AC in the house.

What are my options to keep the flloor dry at all times?

AC enough? Rip out the tiles and put down a membrane?

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 12:55 PM
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The moisture is not coming up through the tile, so a membrane would not help. The issue is the cool floor and humidity.

Solution would be to ac or dehumidify the inside air and do not leave the windows open. Your current dehumidifier probably isn't big enough and any open windows defeat it's purpose. If you want the space to be cooler, use a medium to small ac unit that will run a lot. Too big and it will cycle to hold the temp and not remove enough humidity. If you want it warmer, use dehumidifiers, as they remove moisture and essentially add heat.

Bud
 
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Old 08-24-09, 01:36 PM
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Thanks Bub for the reply.

Right indeed and I understand that the wetness is from the contact of the warmer/damp air with the cold floor and not from up thru the floor per se.

I guess what I really meant to ask was, would a membrane (the 1/4 in foam-like silver stuff...) make the floor warmer (or less cold) enough to prevent the condensation effect between floor and air?

See, the ceramic floor, being straight on the cement, is indeed really cold. You can't walk barefoot on it its so cold.

Thanks again.

PS my dehumidifier is a fair size one with a capacity to do 1600sf.... Its still not powerful enough, I think.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 03:05 PM
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Are you monitoring the RH to see how the unit is doing?

A 1/4" of foam would have at best a R=1 value, not a lot of help, unless you added some electric radiant heat under it. Some how that just doesn't sound right, but it is part of the equation.

Here's a link: BSI-003: Concrete Floor Problems —

Bud
 
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Old 08-25-09, 09:59 AM
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Thanks for the great link, Bud.

You know, after doing some extensive reading over the last few days, I think I will simply start by having a proper AC unit installed and I'll take it from there. Hopefully, that will cure all issues. Taring up ceramic floors sounds like a silly and pointless idea now.
 
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Old 08-25-09, 06:05 PM
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A dehumidifier would be the 1st step.
 
  #7  
Old 03-01-12, 09:14 AM
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Question: My house is new, 3 years old. The ceramic tile in both bathrooms gets damp and causes mildew on the baseboard mouldings. The tile is directly over the concrete. No windows in bathrooms. Can anyone tell me why this happens and how to prevent it?
 
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Old 03-01-12, 10:45 AM
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Hi jomax,
Bathrooms are often a source of moisture. If you have an exhaust fan in them, you should be running it for 20 minutes after showers. They make special switches that when turned off will continue to supply power for an adjustable length of time. Even if you do not have a tub or shower in there, you apparently do have excess moisture so running the fan would still help.

Bud
 
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