Another Leaking Basement Wall Story

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Old 11-24-09, 02:03 AM
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Unhappy Another Leaking Basement Wall Story

I am sure this is the same story as others with leaking basement walls. Except, I have never seen this many leaks before. I have owned my 100 year old house for 7 years and the first 4-5 years there was occasional moisture in one corner of the basement.

This last year was a particular wet one and every wall in the basement had water coming through.

I have pitched the ground around the house several times, pitched the gutters when I put a new roof on this last spring and made sure my downspouts were at least 5 feet away from the house. To no avail, water still gets in and in buckets in comes.

Most of the mortar between my cinder blocks has erroded at the ground line.

Am I hopeless or can I still save my basement?

I am not sure of all the options due to the extent of the leakage. Is calling in the pros the only option?

I have read many of the post similar to my situation but they normally mention a wall or small spot. I am looking at every inch below the ground line is damaged.

Could I clean up the loose mortar and press new mortar in and then deal with the exceptions?

Uhg! my victorian jewel has turned into a swamp.
 
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Old 11-24-09, 01:27 PM
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You have to dig a few inches past the footing along the foundation & seal it with a membrane after you patch. It comes on a roll from a building supply. Throw some #8 gravel in the hole beofre you backfll. There is no fix from the inside.
 
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Old 11-24-09, 04:07 PM
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Hi Willy and welcome to the forum. It sounds like you are dealing with a high water table, higher than the bottom of your basement. If you were to dig a hole 4 or 5 feet deep and it filled in with water, then you will need to drain to a lower elevation, or pump to keep it below your basement floor.

Since you should have a pro come in and take a look at the mortar issue anyway, see what they say about the overall problem. Waterproofing the outside as Pulpo suggested or draining the foundation perimeter are major excavation projects. I would talk to some local contractors for more opinions.

Bud
 
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Old 11-24-09, 05:06 PM
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We used to expose, seal & back fill 10 or 20 linear feet of foundation, 8 feet down, in a day. That was all by hand with 6 guys with shovels.

Bud is correct. If you hit water at 4 feet below grade, that's big trouble. I've only seen that near canals & bays, though.
 
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Old 11-24-09, 09:31 PM
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I understand about the water table but it occured to me that 3 years ago I had to bury some water and electrical to my detached garage. I remember going 4-5 feet deep and never hit water. I am 3 miles from Lake Michigan but I am elevated fairly high. Higher than most homes in my area I would say.

However, I coming to a realization that my problem needs to be corrected from outside the foundation. Was just trying to rustle up some ideas. Thanks for the input.
 
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Old 11-25-09, 07:18 AM
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You can't always relate the water table to sea level, or surrounding bodies of water. Glacier packed soils can be so hard they are rated water impermeable. I have had to run the back hoe through some, and I believe the term. Throw in clay which my house sets on/in and you can have a 2' water table on top of a mountain. In fact we have them here in Maine. That's not to say yours is the problem, but digging the hole at a time when you are not having a water problem will not necessarily answer today's question. Of course having a backhoe makes digging that hole a lot easier so I do sympathies with you. My shovel days are long gone .

If your house is above the surrounding landscape, then drainage to daylight is a great solution. Gravity is a lot cheaper and more reliable than a pump. Sump pumps don't work well when the power is out.

I think you are getting a handle on the problem,
Bud
 
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Old 11-25-09, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Willyv View Post
I am sure this is the same story as others with leaking basement walls. Except, I have never seen this many leaks before. I have owned my 100 year old house for 7 years and the first 4-5 years there was occasional moisture in one corner of the basement.
This makes me wonder what has changed in your area or around your house that could have affected the amount of water on your property. Are you downhill from any new housing developments? Is the new roof on your house a different material than the old roof? Have you been getting more rainfall in the last 2-3 years than the first 4-5 years of owning your home?
 
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Old 11-25-09, 03:12 PM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
This makes me wonder what has changed in your area or around your house that could have affected the amount of water on your property. Are you downhill from any new housing developments? Is the new roof on your house a different material than the old roof? Have you been getting more rainfall in the last 2-3 years than the first 4-5 years of owning your home?
I think doorplug is on a good line of thought. the water could be flowing onto your property from someone else's, either surface water or ground water. check out your neighbors to see if they have diverted ground water or perhaps a new dry-well for gutter downspouts.

I have an 1910 house that I have had water issues from miss placed downspout. I corrected the downspouts and used a flashlight on the inside to find small cracks in the walls that were bringing most of the water in. Then went on the outside, dug down to find the cracks, ground it out with a small angle grinder and diamond blade and patched it. Now I have no issues.
 
 

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