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Wind turbine or powered fan to increase attic ventilation?

Wind turbine or powered fan to increase attic ventilation?

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  #1  
Old 05-08-10, 12:35 PM
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Wind turbine or powered fan to increase attic ventilation?

I'm thinking I need to increase the ventilation in my attic. The 2nd floor of the house is unbearable in the summer.

The attic is T-shaped (roughly 800 or so sq ft) with only a small triangular gable vent on two of the 3 ends. There is one more gable side that is not vented. The peak of the attic is only like 4 feet or so above the joists, so the total volume of the attic is quite small.

I plan to add a square vent to this last side to help increase the intake as there no soffit vents, ridge vents, or other roof vents.

After some research, I don't think there will be enough intake to use a gable vent, which would be easiest way to go. So I thought a wind-turbine roof vent (possibly 2) would be the best alternative.

If I go with a powered roof venting fan, my same fear of lack of intake comes into question again. Correct?

What do you all think?
 
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Old 05-08-10, 04:44 PM
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Me thinks you worry too much. Any air movement beats no air movement. Soffit vents would be great, but even a small gable fan will help pull down the attic temp. You should easily be able to move 200 cfm through a vent. that would give you a complete change every four minutes. On a 90 degree day, you could easily pull a 140 degree attic temp down to 100 - 110 degrees which will really help the second floor temp and load on an air conditioner.
 
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Old 05-08-10, 07:21 PM
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Sounds like to me you have more of an hvac issue than a heat issue. How big is the hvac system for the 2nd floor? I will add that a fan will not heart.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 06:29 AM
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Cutting holes in a otherwise perfectly good roof needs rethinking. Do you have ridge vents? It will remove more of the hottest air in the least time, provided there is soffit intake. Likewise, I think zoning the HVAC would help.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 09:47 AM
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Thanks for the responses. You are right, i probably worry a bit too much and read too much ify info on the web. That being said, every house on my street is identical and our's is pretty much the only house w/out a roof vent of some type.

No ridge vents. I wish.

The reason I opted for roof vents was because a tech service guy from one of the mfg companies (GAF Materials) indicated I do not have enough intake. Adding a gable vent fan will create a negative pressure in the attic which will run down the fan motor very quickly, in addition to pulling conditioned air from the house into the attic.

I figured if I cut out this last gable vent, I will create enough intake for a roof fan of some type.

Is cutting out and installing a ridge vent risky?

HVAC system is pretty basic. Just a single unit in the basement. Seems like creating zones is quite involved?

Thanks again for help.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 10:18 AM
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That 2nd floor needs its own unit! With out it you will never get the temp right. Two units will be cheaper two run than one big unit.
 
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Old 05-10-10, 02:30 PM
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So, are you suggesting all two story houses should have 2 units or two zones? Or, is this more of a suggestion for my circumstance because of the temp. issues I am experiencing on my 2nd floor?
 
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Old 05-10-10, 04:43 PM
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Not sure if the others will agree, but either zoning the two stories, or separating the heating/cooling to first floor-second floor is good for all houses. The one unit has to work too hard to cool the upstairs in the summer and warm the lower in the winter. In contrast the opposite floors will realize an increase in either heat or cool when not needed.
 
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Old 05-10-10, 07:05 PM
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Two units will work better in a two story home. Zone system have to many issues.
 
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Old 05-14-10, 11:45 AM
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whats the location and age of the house?

What is the current insulation?
 
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Old 05-14-10, 05:22 PM
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House is about 50 or so years old. Not totally sure, my wife purchased the house before we were married.

Insulation is probably not so good. Old blown-in cellulose material.

I was looking at adding some additional blow-in insulation, but it seemed to be rather expensive, not including renting the machine. Also, there is only 4 or so feet of clearance at the ridge, so doing anything up there is going to be tight.

Would you suggest more insulation?
 
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