Epoxy floor paint


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Old 08-01-10, 06:50 AM
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Epoxy floor paint

We recently hired a small company to paint our basement floor with no VOC 100% solids epoxy paint while we were on a week long trip. Long story short, I'm going to have to do it myself. We have already purchased the paint so there are no other options for us.

Any advice for using a diamond floor grinder? Our space is not large, 240ft or so. It should come with a vacuum attachment for shop vac, but what sort of respirator will I need?

I have a diamond grinder on reserve at a tool rental place for tomorrow. I'm wondering if I also need to rent an angle grinder to do the edges and corners, or if it will be okay without this.

I am an avid do it yourselfer in plumbing and electrical, but never used the floor grinder before.

Thanks for the advice.
 
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Old 08-01-10, 10:11 AM
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1) Why are you using the epoxy paint on the basement floor? Hopefully not for a waterproofing.
2) Why are you using a floor grinder? Is your floor that rough?
3) Is your basement dry.....really dry?
 
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Old 08-01-10, 01:01 PM
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answers to your questions...

1) The epoxy paint looks great. Shiny, durable, just what the wife wants.

2) Because the floor has latext/acrylic paint on it that we tried painting it with last summer, but it didn't last. We must remove it to put down the epoxy. It's really just surface preparation for the epoxy. We do not want to use muriatic acid. It's dangerous, for one, and it's not so great indoors, from what I hear.

3) Basement is basically dry. When we don't take good care of our gutters they can overflow and cause water to come in under the basement door, though not much. By and large, a dry basement. 100% dry, no. Hence no carpet or wood flooring.

Any suggestions for what I am about to do? I got the paint from epoxy-coat.com. They make a lot of great claims about their products. I hope they live up.
 
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Old 08-01-10, 01:07 PM
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answers...

Originally Posted by chandler View Post
1) Why are you using the epoxy paint on the basement floor? Hopefully not for a waterproofing.

No, not for waterproofing. This stuff supposedly looks great. Shiny, durable, easy to clean. It's what the wife wants and it's in our price range.


2) Why are you using a floor grinder? Is your floor that rough?

No, the floor isn't especially rough. But I am told the concrete must be properly prepared so the epoxy will adhere. It has a coat of latex paint we tried to paint it with last year on it. It just doesn't hold up at all. So that has to come off. Secondly, the alternative for "etching" the concrete seems to be muriatic acid, which is dangerous and not especially palatable to use indoors. So it's just surface preparation, really.

3) Is your basement dry.....really dry?
Basically dry. On occasion we get a touch of water down there. If we neglect our gutters they can overflow and water comes in under the walkout basement door. Dry? Mostly. 100% no.

Any tips on using the diamond grinder or alternatives for what I am attempting to do?

Many thanks.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 03:54 AM
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I've never used a diamond grinder. Obviously any failing paint must be removed. Most epoxys can be applied over existing paints provided it's either the right type of paint or the right primer is used. What does the epoxy label say? Muratic acid is effective on concrete but doesn't affect paint much.

Moisture is the biggest issue with concrete floor paint. Water [occasionally] over top of the paint isn't a big deal but moisture under the concrete will cause the paint to peel.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I've never used a diamond grinder. Obviously any failing paint must be removed. Most epoxys can be applied over existing paints provided it's either the right type of paint or the right primer is used. What does the epoxy label say? Muratic acid is effective on concrete but doesn't affect paint much.

Moisture is the biggest issue with concrete floor paint. Water [occasionally] over top of the paint isn't a big deal but moisture under the concrete will cause the paint to peel.


this is correct. You need seal the floor before painting it. Find a deep penetrating sealer and make sure there wont be any interference with the top coat. That epoxy will be bubbling and peeling if you don't seal first.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 01:17 PM
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Unfortunately Coach you're going to get some differing opinions here.

I don't think you need to seal the concrete before applying epoxy paint. Rustoleum warns that their epoxy floor coatings may not stick if the concrete is sealed. You certainly need to clean it. I've used epoxy floor paint in two garages now and the paint came with a concrete etch. Rustoleum concrete etch is a citrus product, they warn against using muriatic acid.

I also don't think you need any sort of diamond grinder. If you really feel you need to get the old paint off try a floor sander.

I don't want to speak for Chandler but I believe his concerns about moisture have to do with typical wet basement moisture where it perks up through the slab and around foundation walls. Moisture in the slab will probably cause the paint to fail. Moisture on top of a cured epoxy paint shouldn't be a big deal.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 02:39 PM
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I doubt any type of coating used to seal the slab would be effective. As Wayne stated, it's the moisture that can migrate up from under the slab that will cause most any coating to fail. Newer basements should have a vapor barrier under the slab, hard to say about an older home.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 03:00 PM
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In the FWIW category -

I live in a 25 y/o house that floats in a pond every spring. As long as my sump pumps keep working it's only a minor nuisance. Two years ago I painted the floor of a small (8X10) storage room after pulling up some moldy rotting stuff (2X2 OSB squares with a plastic bottom) sold at big boxes as THE solution for damp basement floors. I painted the floor with some leftover rustoleum garage floor epoxy.

I haven't had any serious water since, but I get some puddling around the exterior walls in the spring. So far so good. The paint is adhering nicely.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 04:12 PM
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Wayne hit my answers dead on. My concern was moisture from below. Your answer "what the wife wants" said enough, so we'll move on.
Marksr is our paint guru, so heed his comments. I am a nail driver who refinishes basements. I don't paint, but have run into enough problems with floor paints that I had to ask your questions. It may be a floor sander with scotchbrite pads may remove enough of the chipped paint and be a lot easier on your back. Just a thought.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 05:05 PM
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I hate to even say this but Chandler is dead on! I would not use any floor coating because of the issues.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 06:34 PM
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Update...

Thanks for all of your replies. Here's how things played out and a bit of primer for anyone who is about to use a diamond grinder for the first time. I went ahead and rented a diamond grinder, but it didn't get the job done. In the end they gave me one with just one head and three inserts. The inserts were like little bricks with metal/diamond bars across them.

I was surprised that the inserts didn't fit in the slots tightly. The bag had some wooden shims in it, so I used a mallet and pounded one in on each side. For future reference, only one shim is apparently needed per insert, just pound it in all the way. This worked to hold the shims, but the grinder didn't get much accomplished in the hour plus I was using it. Then the wooden shims started to splinter and broke off ( I did get a bit more aggressive with it, as it was taking forever). I was never able to get the inserts back on and have them hold for any length of time. I called the rental place and they agreed to get me a different machine I can try out tomorrow, hopefully with a diamond head rather than these inserts.

So I didn't get much done today. Just a 5 x 6 patch or so, and the diamond grinder was not so impressive on my concrete, which is old and likely pretty hard. I know people have different experiences with these things, just know that it may be much slower going than you think. Mine was electric and it didn't spin very fast. I suspect that it was originally set up to run on 240v and they rigged it to 120v. Hence much lower power, only 25%, but that's just my speculation.

Thanks for all the opinions on this and I'll let you know how it turns out. I went with the grinding option because that was what was recommended by the manufacturer. If it could've been done properly with just some sanding, crap, that would've been much easier.
 
 

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