Finsihed Basement needs refinishing...


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Old 07-05-11, 08:26 AM
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Finsihed Basement needs refinishing...

Hey Guys,

We have a 1940s Cape Cod built on a cynderblock foundation. From what I wan tell, there is no exterior drainage below grade. We recently installed gutters to keep water away from the foundation, and there is a sump pump.

The front 2/3rds of the basement was finished probably in the 70s, as judged by the solif notty pine wall boards. the carpet is pretty old and stinky. That back 1/3rd is sealed with some light blue water-proofing paint on the floow and the walls...

Over the past couple years, we have had some dampness issues in basement, and we have seen some mold and mildew in areas where there have been organic matter to feed said molds and mildews (places where the cats have puked).

Recently, we had a spiggot break outdoors while on vacation and we came home to a very damp/wet section of flooring as the water drained down the side of the exterior foundation and managed to come up from the bottom of the foundation under the carpet.

Drying fans and dehumidifiers are tackling the problem, but the smell is very bad... I'm thinking its time to call the insurance company, submit a claim, and tackle the problem once and for all...

In an ideal world I would get the current basement (finished portion) and start fresh. If I were to do this, how would I begin to tackle the water issue? What's involved with waterproofing the basement, and where would I begin? what type of flooring works best and what type of sub-floor is needed (DRIcore?)?

Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Bryan
 
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Old 07-07-11, 01:35 PM
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Waterproofing starts outside, not inside. People install sump pumps before they seal the foundation. That's backwards. Look for hairline cracks in the foundation & make note of the pitch. Make sure that the dirt is pitched away from the house. If there cracks in the foundation, it should be exposed down to the footing & sealed.
 
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Old 07-07-11, 02:09 PM
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Yep, the first step is to keep the water away from the house in the first place.

Downspouts on the gutters might also be needed, you didn't talk about them at all.
 
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Old 07-10-11, 04:17 PM
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Hi Guys,

We had gutters installed last year, and the downspouts are all directing water away from the house, and the grading is appropriate other than the back of the house, which is on a hill. In severe rain storms the ground can get wet back there, but only in very heavy and consistent rains. I've never seen standing water, just dampness in the two years I've owned the house.

Thas said, the insurance company sent over a water mitigation service. Three days later the basement has half its carpet removed and a fair amount of the knotty pine boards that showed signs of water damage (from this and "possibly" past water issues). The marked a chalk line about 1/3 up the wall and hit it with a reciprocating That said, about 20% of the wall is a loss, as is a lot of the trim moldings, sil-plates of some walls, and all the carpet. The adjuster will be over Tuesday to determine the best course of action. I'm hoping he will call it a total loss and give me the green light to rebuild, as patching in the walls where wood was removed is going to be a tough job with respect to matching the existing wood. Too bad too, as the wood is pretty nice stuff.

So, now I'm thinking about a total gut and rebuild.

My thoughts are to gut the room, do a proper clean/patch/seal of all concrete and block, and then go with the dricore subfloor system. Have any of you had experience with the dricore system? Does the system go in before framing of the walls? I would assume yes as the sils would be in contact with potentially damp concrete if not on top of the dricore...

So, what are your thoughts?

Is is worth having a professional basement waterproofing company come in and check the place out?

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Bryan
 
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Old 07-11-11, 06:39 AM
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What does your insurance company say about the source of the water?
 
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Old 07-11-11, 07:33 AM
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The adjuster has not been through the house yet. All discussion has been between the mitigation company and the adjuster. I was told it was covered by the mitigation company.

While the spigot break resulted in a lot of water coming down the outside of the house, some water did follow the pipe through back into the house. The majority (~98%) of the water was from outside, but I guess the bit that came inside through the bulkhead was enough to qualify???

Should I now be worried?

I would imagine the insurance company would not give the green light for demo without making the determination that the work would be covered by my policy, correct?

Hmmm....
 
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Old 07-13-11, 03:57 PM
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Well, I've got good news and bad news.

The good news is that the adjuster was cool and covered all my losses to include the mold abatement (probably from old water issuss), demo of any water damaged flooring and wall and trim, and to rebuild the portion of what was torn down by the mold guys.

The bad news is that he did not give me the green light to do the whole basement...

Oh well, I've got some money to put towards the project, which is better than nothing.

I've asked the wife to come up with some general ideas for the space, in terms of fit and finish. The new basement will need to be a playroom for the baby/growing baby, a place for guests to crash (pull out sofa and TV) and a place for my desk...
This is how we are using the space currently, so no big changes, other than to start fresh.

As mentioned before, in an ideal world I would tear everything down, seal the space well with waterproofing, install dricore flooring and build up partition walls, sheetrock, and install a new cieling (probably drop or something of the sort).
In addition, I would like to jinstall a wine cellar/closet or fashion the space under the stairs for wine storage...

I guess my best bet is to bring in a few GCs and get some estimates for the total cost of the project and then see how much of it I can do myself...

I want to keep this on the cheap, and I would be comfortable doing the demo, sealing, flooring, framing and subing out the drywall and final check on electrical. Finish molding could also be subbed out....

Does this all make sense, or am I missing something major?

Does it make sense to have a few GCs bid on the job, see how they propose the jab, and take it from there?

What should I look for in a GC?

All help is greatly appreciated.
 
 

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