Brand new basement utility room


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Old 01-27-12, 08:27 AM
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Brand new basement utility room

I am in the process of starting to plan out finishing our basement. This is going to be a slow process as I'm playing with about 1345sqft, completely unfinished area, and really, I don't fully know what I want to do with all of it.
My first order of business is to frame out and insulate a utility room for the boiler, water (well/fiter system), electrical pannel, sump pit and laundry equipment. All of this is already contained in one corner of the basement, so very little relocation will be needed.
With the type of systems that will be contained in this room, what should I consider doing with the floor in there?
I don't really want to leave it bare concrete.

I am also looking at using spray foam insulation for the concrete walls (two out of four walls will be outside concrete walls). The walls are old, poored concrete with no leaks or cracks that I can see. The remaining two walls will probably not be insulated as they are interior walls and will probably have vents to allow heat to excape into the rest of the basement. The equipment is not exactly loud, so sound insulation is not really a concern.

Any other tips, tricks or suggestions?
 
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Old 01-27-12, 09:31 AM
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You mention that a boiler will be inside your utility room. Find out what it and any other gas appliance require for ventilation. A modern boiler probably brings in it's combustion air from the outside but older models draw it in from the room, requiring a certain amount of ventilation (meaning you can't seal the room up tight).

What do you want for the floor in your utility room? I assume the boiler and other stuff are sitting on the floor so you will have to work around it/them. Paint would easily add some color and give it a neater look but you'd still be standing on concrete. You can use the plastic tiles intended for garages. They come in different textures and colors and would keep you off of the hard, cold concrete.
 
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Old 01-27-12, 09:49 AM
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Pilot Dane:
The boiler is an oil burning unit that is vented via chimney (not the chimney in one of my other posts). Its a stainless steel chimney that goes straight to the outside wall, then up (on the outside of the house). I will still look into ventilation for that unit.
I will also be looking at venting out to the rest of the basement. I believe the bleed of heat from the boiler, hotwater tank (electric) and the dryer would be a lot in a closed off room. The enclosed room is really to hide all that stuff and provide a little sound dampening (not much is needed, but just a little).
As for the flooring, good call at looking into the garage specific flooring. It would be designed for the potential of water, and directly layed on concrete.

Insulating the concrete wall and floor in the area around the boiler and domestic hot water tank should also help reduce wasted heat too. Maybe not much, but any bit helps.
 
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Old 02-03-12, 05:28 AM
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Jason Morgan,

I fully intend to put some vents in the walls and door of the utility room. When you think of it, there will be a lot of heat generating equipment in a small space. The rest of the basement is going to drop a bit in temp.
Hopefully with the main floor hotwater loop (house is hotwater boiler heated) Mostly exposed, the rest of the basement will not get too cool with the boiler, hotwater tank and dryer all tucked away.
 
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Old 02-14-12, 05:35 AM
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Originally Posted by JasonMorgan
Hotwater loop! So cool. I really dislike forced air heating, it's loud and dries everything out no matter how many humidifiers etc you use.

My basement gets cool in the winter but not cold and I really only have 2 vents tapped into the main HVAC line for 1200 finished square feet. In the summer it's fantastic, stays cool even on the hottest days. Frankly I'd like about 800 square feet of house and 2500 square feet of basement.

Speaking of energy savings and heat. I bought and installed a new LED can light in our master bathroom. Pretty cool. I'm thinking of swapping out some of the regular filament bulbs in the basement with LED. I took some video of the installation for my basement site if you want to check it out.


Cheers,

Jason
Hotwater heat is very dry when compared to our natural gas HVAC system we had at the other house. The furnace setup we had at the house we just sold had a built in humitifier (Its pretty dry in the winter here) and a dehumitifier with the central air system.

Back on topic;
With the currently totally open basement, it is nice and comfortable down there right now. The reason I am looking at finishing it is I currently have ~1345sqft of bare, non-insulated concrete walls and floor. The boiler and other utilities (laundry, well, sump pump) can be a bit noisy if I'm down there with others.
The current boiler system has two zones, one for the main floor, and one for the second/third floor. The hot water loop that feeds the main floor runs around the outside walls of the basement (a complete loop) and and with some bleed off of heat from the boiler, the basement is a perfectly heated. Knowing that the bleed off heat from the boiler isn't going to heat the other end of the basement (45-55ft away) where my weights are, I am thinking I may not lose too much ambiant heat from the boiler being enclosed in a room, provided I don't box off the hot water loop in a bulk head of some sort.
Taking the suggestions from Pilot Dane for flooring, what would you guys suggest for insulation (best bang for the buck)?
I'm working with a poured concrete foundation and floor (poured in ~1937). There is no framing in place and the concrete is dry (I've been checking to see if we have any issues as I'm finding little things with the house as time goes on). The basement has ~2ft above grade and the rest below.
 
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Old 02-19-12, 11:33 AM
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boiler room in basement

Keep in mind that making living space in the same area of a combustable device requires that the boiler room be air tight and fresh air be brought in from outside to use for combustion. You can not have the combustion air coming through a door to living space.
 
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Old 02-21-12, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by dmar11bb
Keep in mind that making living space in the same area of a combustable device requires that the boiler room be air tight and fresh air be brought in from outside to use for combustion. You can not have the combustion air coming through a door to living space.
Currently the entire basement is open so it wouldn't be much different than it is now.
I measured out roughly what I want for a utility room. The room will be about 12ft x 18ft.
The boiler is vented out through the chimny (~4ft up, then ~6ft horizontal out through the wall).
With all the other equipment in the room, there should still be a fair bit of air space around everything, so it won't be too tight. Almost everything will stay where it is except the washer and dryer will be moved in ~4ft and I'll need to clean up the pipe work for the boiler as the many retrofits over the years has left some unused equipment connected (but shut off via valves).
 
 

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