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How to properly insulate a partially finished basement

How to properly insulate a partially finished basement


  #1  
Old 02-01-12, 06:23 AM
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How to properly insulate a partially finished basement

Hi,

A little background info . . .
We live in Wisconsin. We have a fairly big basement and to finish off the whole basement would be quite costly. So, we are only going to finish off part of it. We plan to use rigid polystyrene adhered to the poured concrete walls and then build the framing on top of that. Then put bat insulation between the studs. Then drywall.

Questions are, do I need to do any thing with the walls in the unfinished portions of the basement? What about the wall we are going to build between the finished and unfinished areas of the basement? Do we need to insulate it in an special way?

What is the recommend polystyrene thickness for basement walls for a home in Wisconsin?

Thank you!
 
  #2  
Old 02-01-12, 07:35 AM
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I think you are over-doing the walls on the "finished" portion. Keep in mind that the soil, even in the winter is about 50F-55F and not like the exterior temperature the varies radically. People get too wrapped up in exterior air temperatures when it comes to insulating a basement because they do not recognize the thermal inertia value of the soil and concrete.

Eliminate the second interior wall and spend the money on the insulation of the other half of the basement since that will do more good, unless you have an over-riding need to completely finish just part of the basement.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 02-01-12, 01:57 PM
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Yeah I figured it was overkill, but I was just following what I've read and seen on "Holmes on Homes". I still think the polystyrene is a better way to go than bats and plastic barrier on cement walls. Are you saying I could get away with just the polystyrene and not do the bats between thei studs?

We were just looking to save $$ by not having to insulate all the way around the entire basement.
 
  #4  
Old 02-01-12, 03:56 PM
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Use 2" XPS, the rigid foam in pink or blue. There is one that has notches in it for using furring strips. Use tapcons(and adhesive) to secure it to the walls and you can then hang drywall or wall covering on those. Gain a few inches of space. But as he suggested, insulate all the way around, and skip the batts.
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-12, 05:05 PM
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If done right (not trapping moisture, creating mold etc.) there is no such thing as over insulating your home.

If you are working on the area anyway, you may as well insulate as much as you can.

Here is a great article regarding the value of insulating your basement.

No mater what the heat carrying capacity of the soil is, heat loss is heat loss. Even though 50 is better than 10 degrees, if your thermostat is set to 70 your house will continuously try to heat the surrounding soil (especially the area above the frostline).

Of course it would be way more beneficial to "beef up" the insulation in your attic or wall, but if your doing it anyway, may as well go all out (if your budget can afford it of course!)

**oops, this was supposed to be a reply for Concretemasonry
 

Last edited by wewantutopia; 02-01-12 at 05:23 PM.
 

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