Basement Wall Chalk Lines


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Old 02-07-13, 04:51 PM
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Basement Wall Chalk Lines

Hi guys.
Have simple sill question. The photo is on one of my basements walls. I am not going to build the wall in front of, i will probably build a chase and incorporate that into a built in or something like that. Haven't quite decided yet. To set chalk lines on the floor for a wall a person would measure out at a distance at each end and snap a chalk line. How do you do it when a vertical pipe is in the way? Yeah stop laughing please. Measure to the pipe as one wall and from the other side as another wall?
 
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Old 02-07-13, 05:05 PM
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You could snap a reference line that is far enough away from the wall so as to go all the way through. Say... 12 1/2" away. Then measure back from that chalk line on each end and each side of the pipe 8"... or something to that effect, and snap those lines seperately on each side. The reference line would just ensure that the line on both sides of the pipe will line up.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 05:21 PM
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ok probably will work.
Anyone else care to chime in?
 
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Old 02-07-13, 06:19 PM
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I agree with XSleeper. Make marks away from the wall equidistant at each end and a little away from the pipe, then snap two lines. The reference line he refers to will keep your two lines parallel, since you can back measure from there to your marks. It's done like that all the time.
 
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Old 02-07-13, 06:33 PM
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Thanks guys. I appreciate it.
 
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Old 02-20-13, 06:29 PM
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So I used the reference line. I built my first section of the wall and thought it was good. See pics. I then built the next section. All studs are plum. I should have tripled check everything. The wall is not straight. Top plate is nailed to joist. Bottom plate is attached to concrete with ramset pins. I had to stick build because I did have room to build wall and put up. At the far end I checked the corner use 345 method. About 3/4" off. I checked the other end where the next section is to go and the lines in the corner are true using 345 method.
So I guess I have to live with it correct?
Also used a 4ft level horizontally across the boards. How big gap is allowable between studs? Should they all be flush on the level?
 
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Old 02-21-13, 03:04 AM
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Couple of questions. What is the material above your single top plate? In basements it is inevitable to need to stick build them due to variations in floors, etc., so that is not out of the ordinary. If you have a framing square, it would be better to use that than to use the pythagorean theorem to determine squareness, because the concrete wall may not be square. Square up the wall when you turn the corner the best you can. You may be surprised. Otherwise, nice job. What type ceiling are you going to install?

Your studs should not vary at all using the level method. If you do have variations, say more than 1/4" you can correct them. Let us know how large the variations are, and we'll go to chapter 2.
 
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Old 02-21-13, 04:16 AM
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The material above the top plate is 1/2" drywall going back to the rim joist as a fire block.I have framing square and used that as well as a laser. I will be installing a drop ceiling just to keep access to water lines, wire etc. I am going with CeilingMax or CeilingLink because I won't lose as much head room with either of those.
I will use level on studs and report back. Should I start in the far end with the level? Also should I use a smaller level say a 2ft and go stud by stud?
Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 02-21-13, 07:55 AM
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Update

Ok it took about a hour but I have both sections removed from the floor and joist intact. What is the best way to snap a straight line spanning 46 ft?
I have a CST/Berger laser to use as a plum bob.
 
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Old 02-21-13, 06:04 PM
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What is the best way to snap a straight line spanning 46 ft?
Here's one way: One person hooks the chalk line over a nail in the mark at one end of the 46' run, walks to the other end and locks and stretches the line to be on that mark. A second person carefully steps on the line about midway and snaps each section.

I have a CST/Berger laser to use as a plum bob.
Why not just shoot the straight line with the laser and mark it? Or at least mark it every 10' or so and then snap lines from mark to mark?
 
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Old 02-21-13, 06:15 PM
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Yeah I did the second with laser. Wall is up and is better.
Thanks
 
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Old 02-21-13, 06:16 PM
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Not sure why you took the walls loose.
 
 

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