Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Basements, Attics and Crawl Spaces
Reload this Page >

Basement insulation. Have openings in framing to basement walls?

Basement insulation. Have openings in framing to basement walls?


  #1  
Old 06-29-13, 11:10 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 59
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Basement insulation. Have openings in framing to basement walls?

Im in the very beginning stages of finishing my basement. Ive heard mixed views on insulating the basement walls.

The guy that put a french drain/sump pumps in my basement told me this... He said I shouldn't put insulation against the basement walls. Rather, I should leave a couple inch gap between the basement walls and my framing. He also mentioned at every corner or at least a few spots in the basement, I should leave have an opening through the frame. Something to do with not trapping moisture back there and it would be easier for my dehumidifier to take out that air.

Does that make sense to anyone?

To add to this, my basement walls are a little funky. They dont go straight up. They go up, then angle outward, then up again. Im not sure if I should have my framing go the same way or just have them go straight up.
 
  #2  
Old 06-29-13, 12:06 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
"Does that make sense to anyone? " NO
There are seasonal differences for moisture problems and moisture can come from inside or outside. Let me find a link that explains it better.

How to Insulate a Basement Wall | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Is the Airtight Drywall Approach safe to use in a basement? | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 06-29-13, 12:14 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 59
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks. Ill be reading those links for sure.

What about the strange walls I have that arent straight up? Forgive me if your links mention this.
 
  #4  
Old 06-29-13, 12:25 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
A picture would help, and the links only talk (if I remember) about the problems with a gap, not about an irregular wall. Without seeing it, one thought is that the problem relates to the gap between the wall and the rigid insulation. Air can circulate and move moisture from lower areas up to colder areas where it condenses. After the rigid is fitted tight to the walls, then studs can provide a vertical surface and Roxul can be cut to give you a good fill. I would avoid fiberglass. Bud
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: