Colorado Flood - Water Restoration


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Old 09-15-13, 06:49 AM
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Unhappy Colorado Flood - Water Restoration

I own a garden level (half level underground) condo in Boulder that flooded entirely to 4-6 inches deep, water sat for 2 days, and it may flood again today. I am in Idaho trying to coordinate how to move forward - a single, full-time working mom to young children and without flood insurance, so this is a mess. (and not wealthy!, this little condo was my only real investment/savings, and now I will probably be underwater on it, sigh). It appears everything inside is a loss. My tenants have removed all belongings and pulled the carpet and pad out. First quote I got for water restoration (cutting out wet drywall and drying the unit, but not replacing any drywall), was $12-14K. (unit is 860 sf and 2 br/2ba). Some friends on FB have suggested that this is a total ripoff, and I can mostly if not entirely handle the drying myself by cutting out the wet drywall, using a combination of heat, fans, dehumidifiers, etc, and testing with a moisture meter or hiring a company to simply test for moisture.

How feasible is this to do myself (or at least with a worker who is not a water restoration specialist?) Obviously I want to avoid mold and get the job right, but I am in no position to be paying more than I have to. I will be getting competing bids, of course, but time is of the essence and its hard to get ahold of anyone right now, especially from out of state).


Thank you so much in advance for any input or suggestions I can get from you. Such an awful disaster.
 
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Old 09-15-13, 07:13 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Removal of the water is foremost in importance. I doubt you will escape the mold situation, thus a mold remediation team will almost be imperative. Get the water out, get anything that will soak up water out, set up fans. Cut the sheetrock a couple of feet up on the walls affected by the water, as it will have soaked up moisture. You will have floating walls, so cut above the floating part so when it goes back together, it will be rigid enough to keep movement down to a minimum. You are hoping for the best, but I don't see it happening from watching the news reports. My daughter lives in Denver, and they have had some flooding, but they have a sump pump in their basement that has taken care of most of it.

The work part I mentioned is DIY until you get to the mold, if any. Quick action may avert it, so if you can gain access to the property, I'd do so asap.
 
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Old 09-15-13, 07:21 AM
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A relative had a flood in a house years ago. The "specialists" were called in as it was covered by insurance. They left a dehumidifier and a fan. Also checked for moisture with moisture meters. I checked the dehumidifier to see how much water it was collecting... none. It was broken. I called the company, they said it was normal. Sorry but I know a dehumidifier will remove moisture for 85% humidity air if it's working. A week later a different person from the company came to collect all the equipment and do another moisture test. I watched the tester needle did not move At All. After he was gone I felt the drywall it was still damp. He must have had dead batteries in the tester or it was broke. I figure intentionally. The whole thing was a sham. Beware.
If you want the job done right it'll cost ya.
Here, we have lots of old houses with basements that flood yearly, we just run dehumidifiers for months and press on.
Sounds to me like this is a rental. If it were mine I'd remove the baseboard trim, punch ~1" holes in the walls low (at the top of the sole plate) (assuming the drywall is in good shape) and between the studs. And run several dehumidifiers for a month or so. When it's all dry, spray a mold inhibitor into the holes and around the walls. Repair the holes, repaint, install trim. The next flood it will go even faster.
 
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Old 09-15-13, 07:57 AM
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You will have to open the walls up to remove the wet insulation. The carpet and pad probably held most of the water and that has already been pulled. Recently had water damage to multiple rooms and multiple floors in a hotel (third floor fire hose vandalized). The "pro's" removed carpet pad, set up blowers (the kind that shoot air low to the ground) and dehumidifier with hose for drainage out of the room. Took 2 days of non-stop blowing to dry things out. I reinstalled the carpet with new pad. You can rent most of the equipment, however, will most likely be in short supply as many are having issues right now. May be best to rent in Idaho and cart it to Co.
 
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Old 09-15-13, 08:18 AM
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It is a rental but one my children and I very well may live in, in the near future. This is exactly my dilemma - want it done "right" but how do I know if I'm being ripped off, and is it something I can feasibly do myself? Not opposed to removing lower drywall, seems that may be warranted to really let it dry out.
 
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Old 09-15-13, 05:32 PM
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Thank you for your advice. I wish I could get out there sooner than wed night... sounds like time is of the essence to get drywall out.
 
 

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