Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Basements, Attics and Crawl Spaces
Reload this Page >

Concrete repair vs plywood floor over uneven concrete floor.

Concrete repair vs plywood floor over uneven concrete floor.

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-11-13, 02:51 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: canada
Posts: 13
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Concrete repair vs plywood floor over uneven concrete floor.

Have an attached 12 x 15' workshop with a concrete floor. It used to be a carport which was walled in 1990. There are large cracks in the floor and the floor slopes down almost 3" on one side. It is not part of the house slab which is in pretty good shape. There used to be a water problem in the wet season ( I'm in the Pacific Northwest) but we have added drainage around this addition so the floor is now dry. It would be cost prohibitive to use floor leveling compound ($900). I was thinking of leveling with thin set then a mixture of sand and portland cement as advised by a concrete tech, but our contractor is inclined to shim it with treated wood and create a plywood floor. The advantage of plywood is that the floor would be warmer in the winter. Any thoughts?
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-11-13, 03:17 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,894
Received 162 Votes on 152 Posts
Tapered sleepers and a 3/4 t&g floor is probably the way to go if you aren't inclined to bust out the floor and start over with a new insulated and level conrete pad.
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-13, 03:50 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4,297
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As you have been told on a few web sites. Plywood should never be used in direct contact with concrete.
No pressure treated plywood should be used in an occupied space.
It's pretty clear that no one did any proper prep work when poring this slab.
Want it right? Cut out the old slab and start over and do it right this time.
 
  #4  
Old 10-11-13, 07:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: canada
Posts: 13
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks xsleeper. Definitely do not want to bust out the floor. Have already spent a lot of $ busting out other areas of concrete to make a new entry way--plus did my own removal using a sledge hammer. No fun at all. When you say T&G are you referring to some kind of T+G subfloor/plywood?
Came across this idea of shimming perpendicular to slope which would make things simpler.
Workshop Flooring | The Down To Earth Woodworker
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-13, 09:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 457
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I got a chuckle when at the end he said; might want to add a vapor barrier too....lol. In Wisconsin no less on an older garage slab probably without a poly vapor barrier underneath. With surface temps from 40-48; Average Shallow GroundWater Temperatures | Ecosystems Research | US EPA

Read second page, summer condensation; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

Gary
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: