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Decent looking downlights for open basement ceiling

Decent looking downlights for open basement ceiling


  #1  
Old 01-09-14, 10:37 AM
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Decent looking downlights for open basement ceiling

Looking for suggestions for halfway-nice looking recessed light cans or downlights to use in an open-ceiling basement room. E.g. Joists and stuff mounted to them exposed.
E.g. not your typical giant $16 deal with 4 legs that nails to joists.
Since I need 10, I'd rather not get a fancy "downlight", not will much of it really be noticed.

Alternatively, I supposed I could cut out 16" squares of decent wood and mount them through that so the housings are somewhat hidden, but I think that might look a little odd.
Unless somebody has a pic of that
 
  #2  
Old 01-09-14, 05:05 PM
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You may be onto something, and don't know it. Build your 14 1/2" frames and set them flush with the joists. Then cut 6 1/4" holes in them. You can mount old work cans in the holes. They aren't nearly as ugly as their 4 legged brothers. You could do the same with 4" cans, too. Hey, just ideas.
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-14, 05:42 PM
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Hm. I was thinking just 16 or 17.5" so they were crewed to the underside of the joists, but it may look a little nicer if they were set up in there flush or even up by an inch or two. Couldn't go real far b/c I don't want the joists to impede light.
 
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Old 02-13-14, 08:15 PM
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Hey how about this... I was looking into LED recessed light to go inside some sofit boxes, and it occured to me, why not just use something like this
Amazon.com : 12Watt 4-Inch LED Retrofit Recessed remodel Lighting Fixture, Dimmable 90W Halogen Bulb Equivalent, Warm White Frosted Glass Bright White Shell, Remodel light, Recessed Downlight : Recessed Light Fixture Trims : Home Improvement
No can at all
Mounted on painted plywood strips. If it was centered on a 16x16 square, or especially if it was up in there a little, you wouldn't even see the top of the light... then just need a nice way to conceal the wires.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 03:09 AM
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It cannot be installed without a can or "protective cover". Line voltage Wiring must be protected and enclosed. You may get away with low voltage. Also, they are non-IC, so no insulation around them.
 
  #6  
Old 07-01-14, 06:18 PM
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So, I'm sorry, but I don't get it. According to the MFR it just goes right in the ceiling - no can. The outer plastic casing basically is the cover... as far as I can tell it's all one unit - lamp, housing, trim cover. So once the light burns out, you have to replace the whole thing... but at $20 who cares, in 10 years it will be even cheaper.
Being LED the heat is minimal.
so why would a cover be needed?

But here is the rub - to meet code, the junction for the wires needs a box protection. Now in my case it wouldn't be such a big deal to just nail a box to the joist right beside/behind it. But i'd think the MFR should just provide it w/ some kind of box on the end of the wire, makes me wonder how many people just wire-nut that sucker and leave it open up in their ceiling...
 
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Old 07-01-14, 07:03 PM
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The light you posted is for low voltage. You would need to install a 120 volt driver someplace and run low voltage wiring to the fixture.

"Suitable for either high voltage 110V(with driver) or low voltage (wit hout driver) installation"

You might also want to read some of the reviews about line voltage installations.
 
  #8  
Old 07-01-14, 08:47 PM
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It contains the driver - you can see it in the pics... also mentioned in the Q&A. They include it with a connector so you can choose to use it or not.

Several of the reviews & Q&A folks said they did it as a direct install w/ no other parts, aside from adding a junction box for the connection to line voltage...

Oh and re: protection, I will not have any insulation or anything around them since its in an open ceiling.

I ordered just one so I can see what it actually is and get a feeling for how I'd mount it etc, if there is interest I can post pics etc
 
 

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