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Existing Basement trying to figure out best / yet least cumbersome solution.

Existing Basement trying to figure out best / yet least cumbersome solution.

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  #1  
Old 01-28-14, 06:08 AM
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Existing Basement trying to figure out best / yet least cumbersome solution.

Good morning Groups considering this forum recently helped me fixed a humidifier problem via a couple of searches to make sure I was right I wanted to once again turn to here to see about getting some advice.

My basement is basically finished with a cut out under the stairs for storage. However I found that as you go down the stairs there is a major temperature drop and low and behold *THAT* section of wall is not insulated.
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Since I can see up the cavity from the storage area I grabbed a mirror and a light and I can see insulation up where the warm part hits but bellow that it's just the foundation. It looks like it's just the batting type material but I couldn't really tell.
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(View under the stairs)


So here's the million dollar question is there a ''simple'' and not entirely destructive way to get some insulation in there? I get that I would probably have to cut / repair some drywall and probably a small amount between each stud but I'm trying to keep the amount of damage as small as possible. That and I'd be kicking myself if I went hog wild only to have someone say "hey you could have just done X and saved a bunch of trouble"

Thanks in advance.

Bryan L.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 06:35 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Is there any space behind the sheetrock showing 65 degrees for insulation to be placed? Often it is only a monolithic concrete wall with very little spacing. If you have studs, and bays into which you can poke insulation, you may be able to cut the sheetrock (yeah), remove the blue portion, install insulation and replace the sheetrock and finish/paint it. It is not the least invasive, but you will have a clearer picture of what you are doing and a clearer venue for working. I hate working in cramped quarters.

I think the consensus will be similar to picking up sand with tweezers versus a shovel. I would choose the shovel method. But I'm not afraid of demo, since I do it nearly every day. Just gotta be methodical.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 07:12 AM
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Yea there is definitely enough room to fit something in there. Thankfully probably about 2-3 inches from what I could tell. I should say it appears while looking that there enough space that I could probably cut out a horizontal line with enough room to stick stuff down without having to basically strip the all the drywall out and re-finish the entire wall. Just wasn't sure if I could do like a dense pack or a expanding or something in there that I could possibly do with smaller holes to patch. Arguably if your patching a 4" whole it's not much worse than if it's an 8" hole. Especially when you start talking about basically touching the concrete.

Any thoughts on what "type" I should be thinking to use?
 
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Old 01-28-14, 07:29 AM
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As far as insulation goes, I have become a fan of Roxul. It is not available everywhere on the "floor", but can be ordered online at most box stores. It is a dense rock wool product that comes in 47" lengths, and 15 1/4" wide with varying thicknesses. Note the width. It will fit tight into a 14 1/2" stud cavity so it will hold itself. It is virtually waterproof and fire retardant. Of course it is more expensive, but usually you only insulate once.

Still, batt fiberglas insulation is fine, as you probably won't be able to get more than R13 in the wall.
 
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Old 01-28-14, 11:54 AM
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So I spent some time reading around today and yea actually that Roxul stuff looks pretty good. If I may be so bold to ask a question I seem to see a lot of conflicting information regarding insulation against a foundation wall for basement. Some say it's OK to lay directly against the wall. Someway whatever you do don't do it. Some seem to say a vapor barrier and some seem to say under no circumstances use it. Likewise with batting there seems to be "paper side out" "paper side in" "Don't get paper stuff just the batting". Thoughts?
 
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