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Iím so confused about how to build a wall in my basement.

Iím so confused about how to build a wall in my basement.

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  #1  
Old 01-31-14, 01:11 PM
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Iím so confused about how to build a wall in my basement.

Hereís my set up. My basement in unfinished with a concrete slab and painted block walls. I donít have any water in the basement. I live in West Virginia for so we have temps from all ranges of the thermometer.

My goal is to have the exterior walled framed up and install drywall on them. My original plan was simple. Frame up a wall and attach it to the ceiling and floor. Then throw some drywall on it and finish it.

Now after searching the net Iím so confused and not sure what I should do. I wasnít even planning on any insulation since the temperature in the basement is fine. But it sounds as though I should. I have plenty of questions and it sounds like most are debatable.

From the living space to the block wall what order should the materials be placed?

Obviously drywall then what?

Should a vapor barrier be placed directly behind the drywall, on the back side of the insulation (other side of studs facing the blocks) or against the block wall (I guess then itís a moisture barrier)?

Should the paper on the insulation face in or out (to the block)?

Should I use a vapor and moister barrier both? If so once again where does the vapor barrier go?

Should I paint the wall with Drylock first?

What about installing a foam board directly to the clock wall? Is that needed if a moisture barrier is installed or vise versa?

And then what if I do as originally planned and don't go with any insulation at all. Is there any need for a vapor or moisture barrier?

All these questions makes me not want to finish this basement and just live with the block walls and concrete floorÖ.
 

Last edited by Dave Burns; 01-31-14 at 01:53 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-31-14, 08:19 PM
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Before doing anything, read the last sentence of your initial post, as I suspect the answer to your quandary is in there.

But should you decide to forge ahead, the ambient conditions in the basement will determine the answers to many of your questions. Maybe a good place to start would be to have a few remodel contractors in your area take a look at what you've got, and provide you with estimates for their services. Most if not all of your questions will be answered by them, if you make a point of being there when they show up, and pick their brains a bit. If nothing else, you will have a much better feel for what the entire project requires.

Nothing is worse than starting a major project like you're considering, only to run out of ambition and enthusiasm before it's finished.
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-14, 08:40 PM
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Get a few prices from the good contractors (non-franchised or using gimmick products) and find what they would do (and why). Listen very hard to what they think is important from the basic/fundamental standpoint.

Look at the cost and determine if you want it done or how much you want to tackle for what you really need.

That will help you get your feet on the ground and then decide what part you can/want to do and what you want to have someone else to do. That project will be around for a long time and benefit you home values.

Dick
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-14, 04:09 PM
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I'm in the same quandry. My basement is actually comfrotable as well, but the framing the last owner started is not to code, so I'm ripping it out and thinking of just painting over the concrete walls (I posted a separate thread asking if it was ok to do this). It's not like going to be used for entertaining space anyways, more of a semi-finished storage room.

I did speak with the local village inspector and at least in our village you needed firestop between the ceiling joists and the framing if you were to frame and drywall. You need to check with your local residential building codes, just see if the requirements are included in the permit application (if you're going to bother with a permit) or give them a call, I found they were informative and helpful, but just a lot of things you have to consider depending on your city, village, or municipality.
 
  #5  
Old 02-17-14, 09:05 AM
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Here there is the same requirement, must have a fireblock above any space between brick and wood wall.
Here is what I did.
1. Drylocked cinderblock.
2. Screwed a (treated) 2x6 up against the underside of joists, w/ long edge against the mud plate on top of cinderblock.
3. Glued 2" XPS against cinderblock, creating moisture retarder + insulation
4. 2x4 framed walls in front.
That way the front edge of top plate of the 2x4 walls matches up with the 2x6, and makes a nice double-plate for a nailer etc later. And solves the fireblock problem.

Personally I can't think of any reason NOT to use the XPS to solve both the insulation and moisture problems... unless you are on a super tight budget. That stuff isn't cheap.
 
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