Another beam to support the main beam

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Old 03-09-14, 03:25 PM
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Another beam to support the main beam

I purchased a house a few months ago knowing it would need some work. The main beam was 3 2x6's with a pier at 10 foot intervals. There were support columns between each but they were rusted and had fallen causing some sag the beam and in the joists. I jacked it up a little bit (still a little sag but I didn't want to crack all the walls) through bolted a 2x6 lvl to each side, and new support columns. The 2x8 joists resting on the beam carry 12 feet from the foundation to the beam. They are sagging the slightest bit. That said, I'd like to add a support beam on each side so the joists are supported at 6' also. What should I use to make this beam? I was thinking something like a header, 2x6, 1/2 inch ply, 2x6. Are 2x6's enough for support? I am digging footings every 5 feet.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 02:43 PM
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Is there any way that you can post some pics?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 07:34 PM
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Here are some pics. The one with the dirt floor is the first, after I cleaned the entire space. The one with plastic down is after the microlams were up and new columns are in. Then bolted, and last a pic of the width of the beam. In the dirt pic, I'd like to put another header/beam in to support the main beam on each side of the main beam, equidistant from the foundation. What lumber should I use? The footings will be 5 feet apart and will support 6 feet of floor joist on each side.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 05:09 PM
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At this point, anything you do will be an improvement. 2x6s should be fine. What year was that house built? They couldn't get away with a design like that now. Is that a Long Island house?
 
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Old 03-11-14, 08:14 PM
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Yes, it's on Long Island. It was built in the 50's. My guess is the beam is not the original one....and to get lthicker lumber down there they would've had to rip the floor up. The only other option was to go through the ventilation holes which will only fit a 2x6. Today it would've been engineered lumber, which I did think of. However, the joists had already been sagging for some time, and the lumber was settled...if I tried to jack up more it would've been disaster pus to the walls. So I decided to secure the beam, and add additional supports on new footings. 12 inch tubes 2 feet down every 5 feet.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 06:11 AM
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The frost line is 3 feet deep, on Long Island. Do whatever you can & call it a day. The only other option would be to drive a steel beam through the foundation from one side to the other.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 01:19 PM
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Yea. That's what I'm going to do. The footings are below the frost line as the space is already 3 feet below grade. The steel beam is an idea but I'm doing it myself and it would be very difficult and expensive. So I figured this plan would work, and as I redo each room, ill sister joists to level the floors if need be. Most of the floors are alright though. You live on the island?
 
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