Moving basement Jack post


  #1  
Old 07-07-14, 11:27 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Moving basement Jack post

Hi all,
I see several threads on this but everyone else seems to be wanting to just remove a post or move it in one direction.

I have a house that's about 40 feet wide, and has a long steel I-beam running that length. Jack posts are every 10 feet or so.

One of them is right in front of the door to our storage room,so we open the door and then need to go around it which is a pain as the walkway is only about 4 feet across. It's sitting on a 8" high raised concrete square.

My plan is to put up new jack posts on either side of that. One of them about 2 feet to the right, another 2 feet to the left. Once those are in place, remove the existing one. This will result in the spans being shorter than before, so I'm thinking I won't run into any issues.

So am I right? Do I still need an engineer to come confirm this?

Assuming the above plan is OK, should I be putting anything under the jack posts (like a cinder block) to spread the load, or just putting it right on the concrete pad? Also for removing the old one, it's welded to the I-beam, so angle grinding the weld my best bet?

Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 07-07-14, 01:11 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
When they dig a basement they will often locate those supports and pour a pad for each, below what will be the basement slab. Unfortunately we don't know what is down there, or even how thick the slab is. The fact that they used concrete squares under each post concerns me.

Some of the topic pros will be along shortly.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 07-07-14, 04:46 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Canada
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here are some pics for reference.
 
Attached Images     
  #4  
Old 07-09-14, 04:53 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
let's assume they did the job right when your house was built in that the posts are sitting on individual foundations NOT part of the bsmt floor,,, got a little lazy & left adjustaposts instead of the proper cut-to-fit supporting columns but that's not terribly offensive to any inspector

your plan's fine IF you cut the bsmt floor & build separate foundations for ea new column as its s'posed to be done these days,,, NEVER trust a cinder block ( can anyone still buy them these days ? ) - promise if you do it correctly ( incl rebar ), you'll be happy,,, 'specially when its time to sell the mansion
 
  #5  
Old 07-09-14, 05:15 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Green, if you decide to do this right, that steel I-Beam may be able to support more than 10', that is why they often use I-Beams. With an engineers approval (and they are not that expensive) you might be able to eliminate the one or replace the one with just one in a better position. While the engineer is there s/he could also answer questions about what is under each column and as stadry points out, maybe installing the proper support columns.

Repositioning the problem post so you have something like 8' and 12' for spans doesn't seen to out of reason. But doing as stadry suggested, opening the floor to install a solid footing is important. Having cut a few floors myself, it isn't a real big deal. More on that if you head that direction.

More pros will be along (I'm not) but I would be drilling with a masonry bit to see how thick the slab is and if there is anything under it. Last job I tested I quit drilling at 8", that was a sump pit, I was hoping for less.

Bud
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: