Removing paint from concrete block walls?


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Old 07-13-14, 09:38 PM
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Removing paint from concrete block walls?

I would like to apply the following Sani-Tred products to my basement walls and floor:

How to Waterproof a Basement with Sanitred

Questions:

1) What are my best options for removing old paint from the walls?

2) And, there may be mold in the paint - what to do, first?

3) Would CO2 (dry ice) blasting work?
 

Last edited by homeowner888; 07-13-14 at 10:37 PM.
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Old 07-13-14, 10:01 PM
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Get a good scraper, some sand paper and a wire brush or a grinder "depending how much paint you want to take off".

Remove all the loose paint and clean it with 50/50 bleach water.
I would suggest you get a two part epoxy and go over whats there.

If you want to go back to concrete, get you lots of paint stripper..."nasty & expensive job".
 
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Old 07-13-14, 10:31 PM
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If you suspect mold in the paint..... don't just grind or scrape it off as the dust will become airborne.

I would bring a mold remediator for a quote first.
 
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Old 07-13-14, 10:40 PM
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I am now looking at the possibility of dry ice (CO2) blasting ... would this work?

Some companies are using this for mold remediation, too.
 
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Old 07-13-14, 10:45 PM
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Thanks for your reply (PJmax) as I am going to be meeting with a mold remediator tomorrow and let them take care of the mold, first. I agree this would be the smartest first step. I am also going to find out if the mold remediator has the ability to remove paint along with the mold, also.
 

Last edited by homeowner888; 07-14-14 at 12:12 AM.
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Old 07-14-14, 03:44 AM
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I don't recall ever having applied any sani-tred but any coating that seals up the wall is likely to fail if there is too much moisture behind it. For an interior paint job to last long term you need to address any water intrusion from the exterior. Could be as simple as directing downspouts away from the foundation.
 
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Old 07-14-14, 05:35 AM
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Waterproofing is best handled from the outside with gutters, downspout extensions and grading. Putting paint on to stop it when it's already 95% of the way through does not accomplish anywhere near as much.
 
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Old 10-17-14, 05:11 AM
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how did it turn out OP?

To the original post, how did it turn out? I have the same problem. I have resolved the water problem with downspout piping and grading. So now to remove the paint that seems to have mold in it or on the back side. I have already discovered that it can be done with a lot of stripper and a lot of scraping. Like you I may hire a remediator.
 
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Old 10-17-14, 05:24 AM
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Welcome to the forums atbowling!

Often a bleach solution will kill and/or remove mold/mildew. Mold needs moisture to grow and if you remove the moisture the mold will die or at least become dormant.
 
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Old 10-18-14, 03:19 AM
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dry ice is good as is sodium bicarbonate,,, you could also use glass beads [ google ' dustless blasting ],,, what condition's the mortar between the conc blocks ?

some on here think they know but there's a difference once you actually do the work & watch it 10yrs later,,, i hope bowling's right but if that's all he did, he shouldn't be surprised to see the issue return !

a crystalline penetrant [ xypex / kryton ] is more applicable than sanitred which, im-n-s-h-fo, is a positive side material,,, look at it this way - IF sanitred ( a more expensive drylock ) stops the water, what does the water do while its inside the wall ? bear in mind leaking bsmt water is usually acidic having passed thru soil.

[ no $ interest in any of the above names but we do this work professionally ! ]
 
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Old 11-01-14, 10:24 AM
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After you had the mold eradicated, if you intend to go back and re-paint the concrete, use latex paint as it breathes or is porous and allows moisture to evaporate on through, rather than try and seal moisture out as I would think moisture gathered would lead to mold, as well as what marksr said (6th post after yours), that it's apt to fail. I just updated my thread on my own situation: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ba...ml#post2343649
 
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Old 11-01-14, 12:08 PM
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You can also add extra mildewcide to the paint which will help to stop or slow down the return of the mold/mildew. Latex paints are inherently more mildew resistant than oil base coatings.
 
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Old 11-04-14, 03:48 AM
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forgot this - beanee-doo works well, too
 
 

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