How am I doing? Basement


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Old 08-04-14, 09:56 AM
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Question How am I doing? Basement

Hey all,

So I am finishing my moms basement for her birthday and would like to see if I am on the right path. I have looked over the forums and a few books and think I am getting the hang of things. I attached pictures of the first wall I did. The reason I put the 2x4's flat is to save space because of the small size of the basement.

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Kyle
 
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Old 08-04-14, 10:13 AM
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Any wood in contact with concrete needs to be treated material. Not sure what your climate is, but a layer of rigid foam before those 2x4's would offer insulation and a moisture retarder. Before you cannot access the rim joist you should be air sealing and insulating that area.

What is in those storage areas?

Bud
 
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Old 08-04-14, 10:48 AM
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Another issue with laying the 2xs flat against the wall is it gives you no room for your electrical.
I think Bud is asking about the storage area structure, not the contents
btw - welcome to the forums Kyle!
 
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Old 08-04-14, 12:38 PM
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Mark, I'm glad someones knows what I'm saying, I obviously don't . Concerned about more moisture problems, but need to find out where this house is located.

Bud
 
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Old 08-04-14, 12:48 PM
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Bud - have to wait for the OP but my best guess is the location is northeast of you.
 
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Old 08-04-14, 01:07 PM
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Yeah...I would not want to wire that job.
 
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Old 08-04-14, 01:12 PM
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OP is in the Baltimore MD area according to the IP.
 
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Old 08-06-14, 03:55 PM
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Thanks for the replies! The will run through the right side of the room behind a heater which you cannot see in the picture, as well as through the ceiling which will be completed with tile ceiling.
 
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Old 08-06-14, 03:58 PM
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Bud,

The wood you see on the wall is not against an exterior wall believe it or not. It is against an unfinished storage space. Sorry for the unclear pictures!
 
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Old 08-06-14, 06:00 PM
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Maybe I'm wrong, but concrete sucks the water up from below the slab, so any concrete walls or floor require treated wood.

Bud
 
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Old 08-06-14, 06:28 PM
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Pretty sure that ANY wood in contact with masonry below ground need to be rated as such? Prob a good idea for any attachment to masonry.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 03:38 AM
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Actually any wood that has contact with masonry needs to be PT, that includes the bottom plate on a slab above ground and any furring strips attached to masonry above or below ground. Masonry can collect moisture and you don't want white wood sucking up that moisture.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 10:00 AM
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Bottom plates should always be continuous, supporting studs, instead of running studs all the way to floor. As others have implied, installing wiring and receptacles in those walls could be problematic. I would have oriented the 2 x 4s in the opposite direction--a difference of 2" isn't going to have a meaningful effect on room size.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 08:43 AM
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Thanks for all the help! Sorry for my ignorance! Will be using PT wood for the rest... as for what I have done I guess I will have to change that too.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 01:06 PM
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Since the PT wood issue has been beaten now, here is something to think about w/ the slats being mounted sideways - not only is it tight, you'll have to drill a hole through 3.5" of wood to chase a wire between studs - plus more importantly the edge of that hole, and hence your wire too, will be very close to the front face of the wood. That means that you have to be VERY careful hanging the drywall on that you don't put a screw/nail through the wood at that point.
Code requires the edge of holes be > 1" from the edge of the wood for this reason.

Now the good news is, you can use metal strike plates to put over the stud where the wires pass through for protection.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 04:29 PM
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And the bad news is he'll be having a very difficult time drilling those holes, as most drills don't have the clearance (of the drill body) to drill parallel holes that close to the concrete block walls behind his framed walls. I'd furr out with another batch of flat 2 x 4s on top of what's there, leaving small gaps for the wiring runs to pass through. The extra thickness will also enable him to install junction boxes without chipping holes in the concrete blocks.
 
 

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