Lowering drywall ceiling?


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Old 08-06-14, 08:15 PM
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Lowering drywall ceiling?

I have to run a gravity feed pipe above my ceiling from a saniflo upflush toilet. The distance requires a drop of 7".

I want to lower the ceiling flush with the ductwork to make the ceiling the same height throughout the kitchen area. This would give me 7ft ceilings which is code for a habitable space.

Though I have some knowledge of basic framing I am not sure the proper way (if there is indeed a proper way) to do this.

I plan on hanging 2x3's from the wall (with joist hangers) and running 2x3's parallel to and below each joist sistering a short 2x3 on the other end of the floor joist in L shape fashion to be used as a hanger.

I have attached an image of what I came up with to accomplish this. Please inform me if this is the correct way to do this.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 04:18 AM
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I don't know that a 2x3 would be stiff enough where it won't sag [over time] from the weight of the drywall. The carpenters should be along later
 
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Old 08-07-14, 01:01 PM
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What is the height of the ductwork? You need a minimum of 90" for headspace. Mark is right. You may can use a 2x3, but it will need bracing from the joists along the span in order to keep deflection at a minimum.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 02:42 PM
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Hi Chandler, The duct work is exactly 7ft at its lowest point.

I realize adding sheetrock is going to add to this. I got my information regarding height code here. http://www.mass.gov/eopss/docs/dps/i...ing-height.pdf . If I'm reading it correctly it states 7ft for habitable spaces and for Beams and girders ( I assume ductwork ) not more than six inches below the required ceiling height.

I may just have to create a soffit around the duct work just so the ceiling can be an inch or two higher :/
 
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Old 08-07-14, 02:47 PM
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It's always been my understanding as well that 7' was the minimum for the ceiling height. Larry could the 90" be a local code?
 
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Old 08-07-14, 03:30 PM
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Absolutely could be local. If local or state codes differ, so be it. You just run into problems with window and door trim with low ceilings, especially with wider trim. A soffit around the ductwork will open the area up so much.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 09:54 PM
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I tried 3D rendering the soffit and I couldn't get it to look right.

If I went the soffit route, I would either have to make a smaller soffit on the opposite wall into that little bump out on the right in the photo (my sewage pipes are behind there) for the upflush gravity drain or extend what is already a 12' long 55" wide soffit to accommodate for the drain.

If I can get the building inspector to OK my kitchen ceiling being 1 inch shy of 7ft then I think my best bet aesthetically and mechanically is like the attached photo.


Name:  ceiling.jpg
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Old 08-08-14, 05:36 AM
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If walked into a lumberyard around here and asked for a 2X3 I'm sure I'd get a weird look. Never seen a 2x3 sold in a real lumber yard. Were you planning to make them from 2x6s? Soffit is surely the reasonable way. May look wrong to you but nobody else will notice.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 07:41 AM
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My basement is filled with 2x3 so I just assumed they were readily available. I can use 2x4 I just figured the 2x3 would be lighter.

As far as the soffit goes, does the fully lowered kitchen ceiling shown in 3D rendered picture I posted not look good? I can post a 3D rendered picture with the soffits when I get home to compare the two if it helps.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 08:47 AM
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Well apparently there are 2x3s. Lowes advertises them on their site. So apologies for questioning you.

67 years old and doing carpentry all my life and never seen one for sale and don't have a clue where they'd be suitable for a standard application that a 2x4 or 2x2 wouldn't do the job.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 08:59 AM
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I think some things might be regional, I've seen the 2x3s for sale at our local lowes, even used them a time or two. There used to be a lumber yard in a nearby town that sold 7' studs ..... and I've never seen that anywhere else.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 04:38 PM
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Ok, so I spoke with the building inspector and he said the whole ceiling of a kitchen can not be less that 7 ft even by a half inch.

So I drew up another plan with a soffit that covers the cabinet area all the way to the wall and for the gravity drain I created a mini soffit (depicted by the green arrows) that hangs 7" from the ceiling and 4" from the wall. The drain is only 1" pipe but I need room to work with the drywall.

How do you think this will look? Any suggestions or comments are much appreciated.

Name:  Ceiling revised.jpg
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Old 08-08-14, 05:07 PM
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Yeah, I like that a lot. It will give eye relief in the main areas and your kitchen should do well with lower ceiling if your cabinets fit well.
 
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Old 08-08-14, 06:28 PM
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Ok looks like this is the route i'm going to take! I have to redirect some drain pipes from the bathroom upstairs but I already have a plan for that. I have some other questions about framing walls but I suppose I will open another thread for that.
 
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Old 08-09-14, 07:42 PM
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Much better IMO. Low ceilings are a serious drag.
 
 

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