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Replacing steel columns while using the existing footers?

Replacing steel columns while using the existing footers?


  #1  
Old 09-10-14, 09:04 AM
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Replacing steel columns while using the existing footers?

So I want to replace a few steel columns. The existing footers seem to be solid. The columns are imbedded into the footers. The columns are rusting pretty badly at the bases due to long term water exposure.

Is it ok to simply cut the columns at the base and install the new columns over top? I have big 10" x 10" plates for the bottom since I was worried about the rust. I will using an anti-rust coating on the plates as well. I'm just wondering if this is a bad approach and new footers should be poured. I'd be willing to bet they "should" be poured, but what is the real world risk here?

Also anybody have any tips how to cut a column flush with the floor?

Thanks in advance
 
  #2  
Old 09-10-14, 10:15 AM
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sawzall w/hacksaw blades,,, i've never seen columns embedded in a bsmt wall foundation,,, usually they must rest upon separate foundations, not the perimeter foundation or the conc floor,,, column plates should be welded to the column OR otherwise fitted to prevent ' walking ',,, they should also be secured to the conc & whatever load they support,,, then again, its YOUR house so usually little risk til its time to sell & the home inspector goes ' hhhmmmmmmmmmmmm '
 
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Old 09-10-14, 10:33 AM
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I would be interested in existing footer size.
I would also check with city and see what acceptable means are available to attach post base to footers. Such as epoxy hold down bolts. The epoxy hold downs usually need an inspection to insure proper installation.
Be sure to support upper structure with temporary walls before cutting out post.
An angle grinder will also get old posts cut out flush.
Now is your chance to fix this right and that's the route I would take, even if it means new footings.
 
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Old 09-10-14, 03:02 PM
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we don't use epoxy but redhead lead drop-in's instead,,, hilti if we're flush w/$$$,,, i wouldn't want to be on just epoxy but i do want some mechanical backup - hence, lead drop-ins
 
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Old 09-10-14, 05:18 PM
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Understood,
Here's an example of bolts that I referred to:

Attachment 38026
Attachment 38027
 
  #6  
Old 09-11-14, 09:11 PM
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Don 't expect to cut the columns off flush using a Sawzall--it will leave close to an inch of jagged steel protruding above the concrete surface. I would go straight to a coarse wheel on a 7" angle grinder, taking the columns off flush with the surrounding concrete. I've removed many dozens of them this way, and it's always worked well. Just make sure to tie off the top of the column to keep it from smacking something important (like a noggin) on the way down.
 
  #7  
Old 09-12-14, 01:15 PM
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that's another way - 4" grinder,,, do most diy'ers own a 7" grinder ? we use diamond blades on our grinders for steel & conc since they're so cheap,,, abrasives are VERY slow even tho they're made for cutting steel,,, we also use the sawzall & cut them flush despite some other observations
 
 

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