Best way to straighten floor joists?


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Old 09-14-14, 09:22 AM
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Question Best way to straighten floor joists?

A few of my floor joists started to lean on my 40 year old house.

I'd like to straighten and support them before I go ahead and cover everything with drywall. What is the best way to do this without causing stress on the plumb joists around them?

It is hard to see in the picture but the joists slant a good 2" off plumb. The arrows are to show what direction they are slanting.

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Old 09-14-14, 09:36 AM
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The power of warping wood is tremendous. If they were mine I'd leave them alone and deal with them the best I could like possibly scab another 2x4 on in those areas to provide a drywall nailing surface. If you attempt to pull them back you will surely disrupt or pull something loose.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 09:42 AM
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Appropriate size blocking cut to length and driven in, then nailed in place would be about the only way. You'd have to cut some sharply tapered pieces to get them parallel to the double joist, then drive in the square pieces. Well, not truly square, they could taper slightly at the top to allow easier placement.

You might be able to use a couple of small bottle jacks instead of the driven in wedges.

I'm just a DIY type, the Pro's may have a better answer.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 10:10 AM
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I'd leave it alone or place blocking where it would fit.
It's hard to imagine a joist twisting 2" in only a 9 1/4" (?) height.
You're correct, it's hard to see that bad of a slant in picture. There are no bearing walls directly above these joists though and that's good.
 
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Old 09-14-14, 10:33 AM
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If you force the bottoms over, then you will be placing a similar pressure on the top and you really don't know how well that is fastened. Yes, it is secured to the flooring above, but further moving "somewhere" should be anticipated.

What you don't want is that further movement, so as Handyone stated, just stabilize them where they are and pad if necessary to accommodate the drywall.

BTW, I hate fully enclosed ceilings in a basement so here are some thoughts.
1. Some code officials insist on access to the rim to inspect for termites, more often down south.
2. Be sure to air seal and insulate the rim joist.
3. Be sure to air seal all heating ducts.
4. Check for penetrations that allow air flow from basement to attic, directly or via wall cavities.
5. Don't bury any electrical junction boxes.
6. Plumbing will often have "low drain" points and best those have access.
7. Waste clean outs need to be at least marked for future access.
8. Review all electrical and plumbing changes that may be desired or necessary in the future.
9. Once fully enclosed check to see if combustion air needs to be added (if you have combustion appliances, hot water or furnace).
10. Make sure outside water faucets and water pipes are not isolated from the basement heat. Insulation won't protect them if there is no source of heat.

Bud
 
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Old 09-14-14, 03:11 PM
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Thanks everyone, I think I am going just secure it to prevent further movement. Maybe 2" was exaggerated it may be closer to 1" its hard to measure.

I also want to thank you Bud for the suggestions they are much appreciated!

1) Not sure what you mean by this.
2) I will be using sound dampening insulation in between the joists,
3) What do you recomend for this? I was looking at this grey brush on stuff that hardens when it
drys.
4) The soffit for the duct work and the ceiling will also connect to an unfinished laundry room I think this should supply enough ventilation?
5) check
6) check
7) I plan on access panels for sewer clean out etc
8) check
9) check
10) check
 
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Old 09-14-14, 04:45 PM
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1. A termite inspection needs to be able to inspect all of the rim joist, what outer band that rests on the foundation. Not sure if your local code official will allow that area to be inclosed or if in MA they don't care.

2. I was referring to the rim joist, that outer band. I'll attach a link which discusses all forms of air sealing, very important for reducing energy costs.

3. Not familiar with the grey material you mention, but a brush on duct mastic is good.

4. There are two forms of ventilation, combustion air mentioned in #9 and minimum air exchange for very tight homes. But neither of those are what I was asking here. Think about a plumbing stack that runs from basement to attic and out through the roof. The holes that it passes through are usually left unsealed and expensive inside air flows freely around that pipe and out the attic vents. Same for chimneys. In addition, any hole for electrical, heat ducts allows air into wall cavities where it can follow a many varied paths with the same result. The link provided will help.
http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/ste...ide_062507.pdf

Bud
 
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Old 09-14-14, 06:01 PM
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As for the rim joists, I haven't heard of any codes like that around here but its def worth checking out.

I saved the PDF, some good tips in there!

Thanks again
 
 

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