Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Basements, Attics and Crawl Spaces
Reload this Page >

Re-Insulating (and Drywalling) after Water Damage- Help please!

Re-Insulating (and Drywalling) after Water Damage- Help please!


  #1  
Old 10-01-14, 12:39 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Re-Insulating (and Drywalling) after Water Damage- Help please!

We are first time homeowners and our basement recently flooded due to a sump pump failure After ripping up the carpet and cutting the drywall to about 2' up the wall we are finally dry and ready to start the repairs. Once removed we noticed that our previous insulation was a combination of batt insulation and styrofoam. I'm assuming Styrofoam is not an approved method of insulation and am wondering about the appropriate types of insulation/vapor barrier to replace it with. I've read up on XPS and it appears that this would be a good option but I'm uncertain as to whether or not we need additional Fiberglass or a vapor barrier as well. Our house is in Minneapolis, MN and about 4ft of the basement is submerged below ground. The basement, previous to water damage, was completely finished- so wood studs/framing are all in place.

Any help would be appreciated!
 
  #2  
Old 10-01-14, 12:50 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Welcome to the forum Kita,

I'll start you off with some reading specific for basements.
BSD-103: Understanding Basements — Building Science Information

Then this combined article that covers many aspects of a home.
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...build-renovate

The XPS would be good, but it normally covers the entire concrete surface with the studs up against it. Although the XPS has a low permeability it still allows some drying to the inside, which is necessary. No vapor barrier should be used on the inside that is per the links provided and their explanation is better than mine.

Check your local code requirements for how much insulation should be installed and be sure the rigid foam is half of the amount. There are guidelines but I think half works for MN.

Is this out of pocket or is your insurance kicking in?

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 10-01-14, 09:19 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Bud,

Thank you for the information and the links! Very helpful!

We received minimal insurance coverage as it was due to our sump pump so we're trying to tackle the bulk of the work ourselves, where possible.
 
  #4  
Old 10-02-14, 05:36 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
There should be a book on all of the excuses insurance companies use to avoid paying that we can review before we start paying. If your kitchen exhaust fan caught fire and burned your house down, that was your fan so does that mean no or limited coverage? I don't know the reason the pump failed, but pumps fail, basements flood, and we expect insurance companies to pay. If they don't like basements with a sump pump they should say so from the start.

My rant.

As for finishing a basement, I would never do it again, especially on existing homes. Basements were intended to hold up a house and hide the mechanical systems, not to become finished living space. All of these shows where the renovate basements into prime rental space, how about a return visit 5 years later to see what has happened? You will see in those articles that moisture can come from anywhere under the basement floor or footings so managing the humidity is the best we can do. Dry basements are extremely rare.

Good luck, just plan on doing it all again. 2 sump pumps with a battery back-up system might help. Boy I'm in a grumpy mood this morning, where's the coffee?

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 10-02-14, 11:10 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Unfortunately we have to refinish it as the mortgage company is involved- the damage occurred 1 month after we purchased the place.

Once we insulate and re-drywall, we would like to repaint the walls a different color- Does anyone know if drywall primer/sealer will function as a primer over paint as well? Since only the bottom 2' of sheetrock were damaged, we're only replacing those 2' and then hoping to get a somewhat uniform look with primer/sealer and repainting. Any tips?
 
  #6  
Old 10-07-14, 08:05 AM
C
Member
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 267
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Another thought - wainscotting. Saves you the effort of patching in the 2' of drywall, gives you the option of taking down the wainscotting to get to the wall if ever necessary and "adds character" You can put the drywall back up on the wall behind it, but you wont need to tape the joints which is where most of the work would be (trying to make it look just right with the drywall you didnt remove)

Unfortunately I couldnt talk my wife into it so I ended up replacing all of the drywall....we had a small amount of water but its amazing how much drywall soaks up. 1" of water and the drywall was moist to about 18" off the floor. Instead of trying to patch it all I just pulled it all out. Had an interior drainage system installed at the same time because everything was open.
 
  #7  
Old 10-07-14, 02:35 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 48,139
Received 403 Votes on 359 Posts
anyone know if drywall primer/sealer will function as a primer over paint as well?
The primer can be applied over paint but generally it isn't necessary to reprime over painted walls. The repairs need a primer but it only makes sense to use the primer over paint if it facilitates the color change.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: