Stabilizing a cider block cracked wall


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Old 10-07-14, 12:24 PM
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Stabilizing a cider block cracked wall

I am preparing for the worse and while I am waiting for my inspection camera to arrive I am looking for solutions to fix my supposedly cracked wall. So far I can say that a crack is there by just two signs:
-it is visible from outside under the corner of the window
-something is wet or was wet under the floor on the vertical leading to from that corner of the window to the floor
THis is about a finished basement, insulation and drywall in place

During my research I just realized that I will need to seal and to stabilize a cider block wall (concrete bricks) and the solution for this might be specific to this type of wall.
So far I have identified two options:
1) channel steel -applicable for more deteriorated walls (at least 1" slide for the wall
2) carbon fiber repair kit

What do you guys think about these two in terms of cost and effectiveness?
Would these stabilize the wall to the point where the blocks won't move anymore and the materials applied from outside will be protected from cracking?
 
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Old 10-07-14, 01:47 PM
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try this,,, we use 'em rather'n have I-beams bolted to the foundation/floor truss's,,, box beams also stand out when buyers come look @ your very fine home,,, IF you can patch it right, they're invisible,,, IF you put a 4' level on the crack, what's the displacement @ 2' ?Name:  invisible wall pins.jpg
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this also works well for concrete as well as cider blocks :-)
 
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Old 10-07-14, 04:47 PM
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The picture is not very clear, could you please post a better one? Is the product called Durawall? I was not able to find much about it

Edit: is it this?

I can't understand how you insert that into the wall
 
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Old 10-07-14, 06:43 PM
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PF4DIY -

What makes you think that wall need to be stabilized for lateral loads? Is there any bowing inward of the wall?

Cracks radiating out from window corners are common it both block and poured basements, but they usually shrink before getting to the footing. Since your wall is finished, the water may be entering the crack. leaking through the wall an running down to the floor where you see the water is appearing. That does not mean the wall is leaking from the entire height. - The effect of the leak is just where water shows up to the eye.

I suggest diging down a few feet in the area below the corner and see if what the surface of the concrete looks like before doing a major structural foundation rebuild ($$$$'s) and require removing all interior finishing.

It is possible the area does not have decent water proofing that can be prudently and cheaply done by cleaning and bonding waterproofing to the wall that may be structurally sound.

Joint reinforcement wire is not really a structural reinforcement item. It is used to provide longitudinal continuity of the wall between joints for crack control. It can also be used to make two wythes of thinner units into a wall that acts as a thicker wall.

Dick
 
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Old 10-08-14, 03:09 AM
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or this: Rhino Carbon Fiber Bowed Basement Wall Repair Materials - Applied Technologies [ no $ interest ]

to insert bars inside the wall, break open cells that are vertically aligned,,, 1 in the btm course, 1 @ midpoint, & 1 in the top course,,,then feed in 4' lengths for a 7' wall,,, overlap bars & tie 'em together,,, we fill voids & encase steel w/12,000psi grout
 
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Old 10-08-14, 07:46 AM
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Hi ConcreteMasonry

So far there is no sign that I will need this but everything is behind drywall. This is a finished basement and for the moment I can't see anything behind the drywall without ripping off the walls.
I have ordered a cheap inspection camera (USB HD inspection camera 720p) to have a quick look at what is there. I will use the power outlets to look behind the wall.
The drywall walls are straight as far as I can see, I guess that they should bow with the cider block walls behind them if those are bowing. I just wanted to know, in the worst case scenario, what it takes to reinforce these walls. I might chose to do that just to prevent any future move, I am planning to stay in this house for a longer while and by the time when the problems may appear again (it is a 56Y old house) I might not have the financial or the physical resources to do it so I would rather take preventive actions now if that is needed. I will see what is behind the drywall first and I will decide after that.

Re digging around the corner: my initial plan was to dig down to the foundation in the area where the exterior crack is and to waterproof, and fill in the crack. Our forum buddy stadry suggested that by that way I am going to create a more vulnerable zone in that area and the water will converge to the excavated section since the soil is not compacted there. This is the only thing that stopped me from started digging so far.

Yesterday we had like two hours of good rain and I could look at what is happening in that corner from outside. Definitely the patio is the source of the problems here. That and the pour grading of the soil on the other side of the corner, the one with the basement window. It happens like this: it rains heavily, the patio can not absorb the water entirely and it all pools in that corner of the house. there are a couple of other small areas where the water is pooling, one of the also close to the corner. From that corner the water used to overflow over the edge of the patio close to the corner of the house. What I did was to open the patio corner that is circled in this diagra to provide some relief but that was not enough because of the poor grading to the right of that area. I assume that underground the water still found its way to the wall and to the crack.

My quick fix for this would be to install a frech drain or a channel drain in the area where the patio reaches the house and around the corner continuing on that side of the house where the windows are. I am only afraid that this will add more work when and if I need to dig to the footing.
 
 

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