Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Basements, Attics and Crawl Spaces
Reload this Page >

Crawlspace fireproofing vs. Vapour barrier installation

Crawlspace fireproofing vs. Vapour barrier installation


  #1  
Old 10-24-14, 01:17 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Montreal
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Crawlspace fireproofing vs. Vapour barrier installation

Hi folks,

My crawlspace has spray-foam insulation all around the inside perimeter which we had covered with a fireproofing material last year on the home inspector's recommendation. I plan on hiring a basement encapsulation company to install a vapour barrier and their procedure is to run the VB up the walls and attach it with plastic fasteners/screws drilled in followed by caulking. I'm concerned that the fasteners will penetrate the fireproofing and render it useless. Is this reasonable? I know very little about the subject.

Thanks
Marc
 
  #2  
Old 10-24-14, 01:45 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Fill us in on the "fireproofing" material. Foam cannot be left to the elements, as it must be covered. In basement situations, it is done with sheetrock....not fireproof, but better than exposed foam. Pictures would be helpful as well so we can see what you are seeing. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 10-25-14, 05:59 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Montreal
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The company calls it "hydraulic cement" on their website and it looks similar to this.

A side question that I've amazingly never considered: Is the purpose of the fireproofing to keep a neighbour's fire from spreading to the building or to keep a fire in the crawlspace from burning the insulation?
 
  #4  
Old 10-25-14, 02:00 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Foam will burn and will emit toxic fumes as it burns, so it must be encapsulated to prevent it from becoming the primary fuel. I am not familiar with the product you show. Maybe one of the others will have had some experience with it.
 
  #5  
Old 10-26-14, 10:13 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Montreal
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks. Even though you don't have experience with that particular product I feel as though you may have answered my question. If the point of the fireproofing is to keep the foam insulation from burning heavily, a few holes in it should not, I don't think, change that very much.
 
  #6  
Old 10-26-14, 10:36 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
You are correct. Even chasing the fasteners with a concrete product such as a patching material will suffice to segregate the foam from the atmosphere. I sure hope Bud checks in here to help with this stuff. I have never seen it. It really looks like old 1960's asbestos, which I am sure it is not.
 
  #7  
Old 10-26-14, 12:21 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
Hi,
In residential applications I have never run into anything like that. One commercial job had something that looked similar, but it was more like tough cardboard as opposed to cement.

In any case, I think your reasoning, Chandler and Marc, that any fasteners used would create a minimal problem for the purpose of the material. In reality, any of the materials used to cover the foam are not intended to make it fireproof, but slow the process to give people time to exit.

Marc, when you say "their procedure is to run the VB up the walls and attach it with plastic fasteners/screws drilled in followed by caulking." how far up the walls do they go? Generally a foot is fine. To make recommendations beyond that we would need to know the moisture issues involved and the open/closed cell nature of the foam. But the foam can't be changed so unless they have a reason for covering more, just one foot should do.

Bud
 
  #8  
Old 10-26-14, 01:33 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Montreal
Posts: 35
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys. I found the name of the product, which is Monokote.

Bud, the vapour barrier will run around a foot up the walls. I don't quite understand how that makes a difference to the fire-retarding capacity of the Monokote, however.

Marc
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: