Installing Interior Drain Tile Correctly


  #1  
Old 11-04-14, 12:33 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installing Interior Drain Tile Correctly

Hi Everyone,
I'm getting different variations on how to install interior tile for a crawlspace. It has a dirt floor with a vapor barrier covered with gravel. The wall is 4' sitting on a 16 x 8" footer. Some have advised just at the footer and depth doesn't matter, others move it out 12-18", etc. My questions are: can/should you dig down next to the footer or away from the footer, if so how far, how deep should it be to have an effective drain to the sump? Does the tile need slope? What are the steps in putting in an interior drain tile for a sump pump correctly? I'm concerned about compromising the integrity of the footers. Some 'experts' around here say that is not an issue. I'm not convinced at this point.
Thanks in advance for your advice.
 
  #2  
Old 11-04-14, 03:44 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
1st off, no one used ' tiles ' anymore,,, most use 4" ads hdpe flexible pipe - typically 100' or 50' rolls - but 4" s&d's also fine,,, i like pipe w/circular holes better than slits,,, next to the fnd is fine - we're doing 1 today that way,,, you only need to open 1 side rather than 2 so less work for same performance.

i does help if you slope the trench towards the sump but don't dig below fnd's btm,,, water will run to the sump as it seeks its own level,,, best results are a 12" x 8" trench lined w/soil filter cloth & 57stone,,, would be nice to incorporate a couple 4" cleanouts/inspection ports for future ease.

pump selection is important - look on ebay - we use nothing but zoeller m-53 pumps,,, they're also the std of waterproofing trade

good luck !
 
  #3  
Old 11-04-14, 06:37 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
stadry, when you say "you only need to open 1 side rather than 2 so less work for the same performance". What are you referring to?

Also I have gravel and vapor barrier to put back. What is the correct way to install back? Currently, water is getting on the vapor barrier and I'm afraid it might get trapped.

Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 11-04-14, 09:03 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I ran on to a thread that says: "your footing requires bearing that extends out 45 degrees from the bottom of your footing." Could someone explain this?
 
  #5  
Old 11-05-14, 03:54 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
8" wall requires a 16" wide footing,,, if you could draw a line from top of fnd @ wall point to btm of fnd, the angle would be 45*,,, since you're digging alongside the fnd, that's 1 side, ok ?

line the trench w/soil filter cloth, 1" of bedding #57 stone, pipe, fill w/57, fold over soil cloth on top, miradrain from 3 or 4" up the wall, across fnd, & fold down into trench,,, THEN vapor barrier & new conc on top,,, be sure to drill drain holes into the block's cells & webs to drain

ok ?
 
  #6  
Old 11-05-14, 06:21 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
stadry,
I understand the 1 side. Thanks for the clarification. The 45 degrees still doesn't make sense. To me it means if an imaginary straight line is drawn out from the bottom of the footer and then a line drawn off that line at 45 degrees at the bottom of the footer point. Would that be the same thing as you are describing?
 
  #7  
Old 11-05-14, 06:35 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
redrose -

You are right about the 45 degree line drawn downward from the TOE/bottom of the footing to define when you are upsetting the foundation stability. That defines the loading area for the soil below the footing.

The concrete wall and footing are far stiffer and are the direct load path for vertical loads. It is rigid and far stiffer than the soils above and outside of it. In the case of a narrow strip footing that is only projecting only 4" or 6" beyond the wall face, the wall actually becomes a vertical beam (wall and footing) with an enlarged base. Overly wide wide footings require transverse steel structurally in addition to any longitudinal reinforcement that a model code MAY require.

Dick
 
  #8  
Old 11-05-14, 08:31 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Dick,

Thank you for the clarification. I appreciate it. In applying the 45 degree rule, if you moved over 1" you could go down 1", over 2" down 2" and so on. Would this be the correct application? What would be your advice for installing the interior drain tile correctly (including materials, steps, etc.) so it is efficient and effective? I have a solid 4' concrete wall sitting on a 16" footing in a crawlspace with dirt, then vapor barrier, and gravel on top, no concrete floor. I think the footer is 8" in depth, but I'm not sure how to confirm that.

Mike
 
  #9  
Old 11-07-14, 08:40 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: usa
Posts: 1,348
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
you'll find out when you dig just did 1 yesterday turned out the footer was placed on granite,,, we had to move the trench 8" to miss the granite shelf,,, also discovered wire mesh in the existing conc turned a 1 day job into 2 no way to see thru the existing conc even w/35yrs experience

IF i were you, i'd move the trench out from the fnd an addl 4 or 5"
 
  #10  
Old 11-07-14, 07:25 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks. Having experience in those areas always helps. Experience is the best teacher.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: