Sealing off sump pit


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Old 11-17-14, 04:05 PM
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Sealing off sump pit

Hello, I was wondering if there was possibly any way to seal off my sump pit in case of a sump pump failure, the water would not overflow out into the basement.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 05:15 PM
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Sealing the pit would not prevent a a wet basement if the water rises above the floor. The perimeter of the slab will usually leak. A back-up power system for the pump like a generator as opposed to batteries.

In some cases a very large sump pit can buy you a short amount of time.

Bud
 
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Old 11-17-14, 05:21 PM
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I guess I should have given a little more info, the basement has an internal french drain system, I never lose power here, but what had happened was a sump pump failure which resulted in a flooded finished basement (only about an inch of water though)

I do have a lot of slope from my house to the front of my property, I was thinking of digging outside of the foundation where the existing sump pump is, install a large external basin and hopefully allow gravity flow down to the drain at the end of my yard, is this feasible? Basically using a combination of my internal french drain system and an outside system.
 
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Old 11-17-14, 06:58 PM
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It's not always easy picturing a remedy but maybe the french drain system can be connected to the new pipe and led away from the house without a new basin.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 04:29 AM
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Thats more of the idea I had, but if I can't get enough drop, I would rather put a large basin with an ejector pump in it to discharge the water, if the pump failed, then I would at least have some time before it filled up.
 
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Old 11-18-14, 04:58 AM
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You can install a warning system to tell you the level has gone too high, fairly simple. A gravity drain is always great, just be sure it doesn't clog from soil or roots. A ditch witch can dig a deep narrow trench to install a pipe with minimal disturbance to the yard. They can be rented.

A second pump is also a good idea. It seems like overkill until the primary one fails. It could also be set to power a light or alarm for that warning signal.

Bud
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:04 AM
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I have access to a mid sized backhoe so the trench wouldn't be difficult, I would need to go down about 6' to the footer of the house, drill a hole into the internal french drain and install pipe, I would then use 4" pipe to travel the distance from the house to the road, leaving plenty of drop as I go. This would allow the water to collect in the internal french drain and run outside the house into a collection pipe and down to the road.

Any flaws in this logic?
 
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Old 11-18-14, 07:28 AM
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The couple I have done have been to edge of property dry wells well below the basement floor and worked transparently. Be careful with a 6' deep trench as I'm sure you know.

I'm in cold country as well so draining to the surface can be a winter problem. Digging a large dry well that can percolate into the soil below, assuming you have the soils and the low water table to do so, is an option.

Sounds good.
Bud
 
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Old 11-19-14, 03:28 AM
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what kind of pump - not zoeller, was it ? on occasion, we've also installed a wtr-power'd pump AND m-53 zoeller ( std of the wtrproofing trade ),,, 12v backup's are for a short duration no matter who makes 'em & 1 is rarely sufficient for the usual need,,, we buy pumps on ebay - about $120 + $20 shipping - beats paying $175 @ ferguson

your logic's correct - gravity drainage is always best don't forget silt cloth & #57 stone - NEVER use silly cloth socks on pipe
 
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Old 11-19-14, 05:29 AM
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It was indeed zoeller, the float mechanism failed on it, it was sticking in the down position. I replaced it with a goulds with a separate tether float, that way I know the float won't be getting stuck. I want to stick another pump in for backup, but I don't think I have enough room in the pit.
 
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Old 11-19-14, 07:05 AM
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I Know it would be a pain, but I like two pits in different corners of the basement. Which corners or even if that is a good option depends upon your basement.

One of the tether floats you used set at a higher level and powering a light or warning off some sort is what I was thinking of earlier.

If your pit is like most, the pump empties it in about 2 seconds. A pit should really be much larger to reduce the frequency and increase the pump time. Unfortunately, once they start working they are quickly forgotten, until next time .

Bud
 
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Old 11-19-14, 08:39 AM
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The perfect spot for another pit would actually be in the same utility room but the opposite corner, because what I actually found is that is the low spot, it just would be one major under taking to do, I do have the skill and tools to do it, but man its going to be a pain.
 
 

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