Considering Moving a Lollicolumn in Basement


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Old 11-24-14, 02:00 PM
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Considering Moving a Lollicolumn in Basement

I am considering moving a lollicolumn in my basement. I will replace/add to my current carrier beam with microlams and/or steel as necessary and recess them into the ceiling so that the ceiling joists (which currently lay on top of the carrier beam) will get tecoed in to the side of the new beam.

The beam runs through the center of the house. On the main floor, there is no load (it has all been moved with microlams in previous jobs) except for the floor itself. But, dividing the room in half with the beam in the center, the kitchen is in the back half, the living room in the front half.

In the kitchen, there is an island with granite and a tile floor. The kitchen doesn't sit on top of the beam--it is about 3 feet back. So, the kitchen is about 10 feet deep, and the living room, is 16 feet deep, and the beam runs through at about the 13 foot mark.

So, my question is: if I recess the carrier beam in the basement, am I risking cracking my tile or the granite on the island?

Assuming the job is done properly, there must be some kind of movement, right? Or not necessarily?
 
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Old 11-24-14, 03:54 PM
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#1, This would be a permitted and inspected job.
#2, This would not be a normal DIY type of job.
#3, Very likely at least the tile would end up cracking.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 06:38 AM
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So, I'd be looking at re-doing a tile floor. Hmm, wondering if it is worth it.
 
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Old 11-25-14, 09:18 AM
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You'll have to get an engineer's sign off on the plan before you can get a permit for that type of job. He should be able to give you a rough idea of what the cost will be and any collateral damage that would be expected.
 
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Old 11-26-14, 03:12 PM
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I'm looking to do this myself (hence the post on DIY forum).

I've done two microlams (one with steel) already on my main floor. the work isnt an issue, and figuring out the load isnt an issue. Im just not sure how much movement will happen during the temp wall/remove beam/teco step.
 
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Old 11-26-14, 05:54 PM
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It sounds like you want to go without the permit and engineer step, which makes it difficult for me to say your are fine, but that is an issue we face often.

As far as the amount of movement, it will be very difficult to remove what is there and install new support without something moving. How much and related damage impossible to say from where I'm sitting.

I do wish you the best,
Bud
 
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Old 11-26-14, 09:39 PM
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Yes, I am looking to do it without the permit and engineer step as I dont think those two things will make it any less likely that something might move--it might tell me what kind of movement to expect.

I was hoping to get some responses saying that, if done "right" there should be minimal movement and little chance of tile cracking.

But Im guessing I might be better off just leaving the column.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 03:03 AM
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NY will vary in regards to permits, from woods to the city, but even up here in Maine, building inspectors (at time of sale or appraisal) are looking for everything to have been properly permitted. Even insurance companies are looking for excuses to not cover related failures.

As for estimating the movement/damage I have leveled a few older homes and it has always been amazing how difficult they are to get anything to move. I know you don't need/want things to move, but you do need to transfer the current load to a temporary system to be able to remove what is there. Then reverse the process to put the load back to the new support. Any work like this I have seen from a jacking company has involved many jacks and lots of support. Never asked about related damage, but my bet is there were certainly wall cracks even with the abundance of equipment.

I'll leave you alone and get ready for my shoveling and plowing. Looks like 12" to 18" at my house here in central Maine. Haven't heard the official total.

Bud
 
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Old 11-28-14, 04:59 AM
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i'm missing something,,, a main carrier beam recess'd into a ceiling/sub-floor ? how could it support joists ? whatis ' tecoed ' ? ? ? maybe its too early for me
 
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Old 11-28-14, 05:39 AM
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Good morning stadry. Glad someone else draws a blank once in a while besides me. I think he is referring to hanging the floor joists off of joist hangers. He did mention "toe nailed" I think (tecoed) but he should clarify. Either way, joist hangers would be necessary.

Supporting the floor joists, cutting them back to allow for the new carrying beam, inserting the new beam and supporting it, installing all of the joist hangers (with nails and not screws), and then transferring the load to the new beam and removing the temporary support is all sure to shake things up quite a bit. Definitely a project whether he tries it or brings in a crew.

Bud
 
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Old 11-28-14, 07:50 AM
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rmathome,

I think Bud and the others have given some good advice.
I would definitely get a permit and an engineer's advice.
Engineer will advice on beam supports (at ends), and joist to beam connections.

I don't think this would cost a fortune, for the planning, and well worth it.

I personally think the tile floor could be supported with no movement. You will have the temporary wall under the joists, plus the building has a way of acting as a unit and will have some sort of integrity even with existing beam removed.

All that said, do yourself a favor and get some professional advice.
 
 

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