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Term for basement wall that is half concrete - half 2x4 stud?

Term for basement wall that is half concrete - half 2x4 stud?


  #1  
Old 12-01-14, 10:33 PM
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Term for basement wall that is half concrete - half 2x4 stud?

I'm researching basement finishing options and one thing that is getting in the way is that I don't know what to use for search terms referring to the type of wall I have on the base of my basement.

The lower half is concrete, and the top is framed.





How do you refer to this type of wall?
 
  #2  
Old 12-02-14, 03:03 AM
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It is called a knee wall in some circles. Aren't you going to cut this wall out for a door?
 
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Old 12-02-14, 03:31 AM
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In our neck of that woods it would be referred to as a pony wall and some would call it a knee wall.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 03:44 AM
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It could also be called a foundation wall - it just didn't need to go all the way up to the next floor because of the low grade on the outside. I've heard it referred to as both a knee and/or pony wall.

What are your plans for that room? you could either frame up a short wall in front of the concrete and have a ledge where it meets the wood frame or bring the new wood frame all the way to the ceiling.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:11 AM
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Anyone notice there's what looks like 14-2 and 12-2 in the same box?
Hope it's all on a 15 amp. breaker.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 11:33 PM
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Anyone notice there's what looks like 14-2 and 12-2 in the same box?
Hope it's all on a 15 amp. breaker.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ba...#ixzz3KozS4Fx5
Yes That's all coming out soon. The basement lights and outlets are all on the same breaker. The older gentleman that lived here briefly after the house was built, ran some of his own outlets off of other outlets. That double gang is ran 12-2 to a switched light, and 14-2 to an outlet on an adjacent wall.
 

Last edited by EvilBetty; 12-03-14 at 12:51 AM.
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Old 12-03-14, 12:26 AM
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Aren't you going to cut this wall out for a door?

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ba...#ixzz3KozZDTrU
Yup, window is coming out. Was looking for different ideas to insulate and finish the wall.

The full walls will have 3/4" foam board, then a framed wall with un-faced R-13 fiberglass.

For the knee / pony wall, I'm thinking of covering it all with 3/4" foam board, then placing furring strips, then another 3/4" of foam between them. I was going to use 2x2's against the concrete and fill between, but I think I'd have a better air seal this way.

Still not sure what to do with the rim joists. There is already un-faced insulation up there. Not sure if should leave it as is, or pull it out and cover it with foam board and caulk to seal it against the joists and sub floor.

Also unclear if I should be installing the foam board against floor or leave gap for crack-sealer foam. Not sure how this would affect the cove joint.



Full Size Pic
 

Last edited by EvilBetty; 12-03-14 at 12:41 AM.
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Old 12-03-14, 10:33 PM
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In retrospect, my question in my original post was answered should I put that last post in a new thread?
 
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Old 12-04-14, 02:37 AM
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No new post. We read them all and you are on the same basic project. We can follow you. Sometimes we take time to digest all that is going on, thus the delay in answering. Are you going to leave the knee wall exposed, or will you be building a solid wall across and inserting the door? Building an independent wall will solve your problems as to insulation, electrical, etc. Not sure what your plans are on that.
 
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Old 12-07-14, 11:56 PM
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Thanks,

The door I bought is a right-hand outswing door.

I had considered building a full framed wall in front of the knee wall, but my last "soft decision" was to insulate it and sheetrock as is using furring strips as in the picture above. One layer 3/4" foam, 1x3" furring strips, then 3/4" foam between them. Then sheetrock.

I planned on all the outlets to be at the 4' level, which would be above the knee wall.

I'm trying to get started on the insulation of the full walls but I have a couple questions first.

The rim joists already have un-faced insulation stuffed in there. Should I leave it as is, seal foam board over it, or pull it out and seal it with foam board?

Should I be installing the foam board against floor or leave gap? I haven't done anything to the cove joint.

Do I fill the gap with crack-sealer foam? If so, is this done before, or after setting the bottom plates?

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-16-14, 08:27 PM
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Should I be installing the foam board against floor or leave gap? I haven't done anything to the cove joint.

Do I fill the gap with crack-sealer foam? If so, is this done before, or after setting the bottom plates?


There's no French drain or anything in the cove joint, right? Because crack sealer foam sounds like you're talking expanding foam to fill something big.

The exposed cut edge of foam board insulation should be fine touching concrete, email the manufacturer to make sure. If not, and you leave it 1/4" short of touching the floor, why do you want to seal that space with "gap sealer foam"? I doubt you'll get any draft through the concrete wall and if you get moisture, it could affect the R value of fiberglass but it would probably be undetectably minute and the FG should be 1" from the wall anyway.

The foam boards you're talking about putting over the concrete knee wall might add up in cost and might rather just frame a 2x4 half wall 1" off the concrete face and putting paper face R12 fiberglass and then frame a shelf ledge to connect to the top half of the existing stick framing.
 

Last edited by gunner666; 12-16-14 at 10:47 PM.
  #12  
Old 12-20-14, 01:05 AM
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Yikes, missed notification of this. Thanks for the reply.

A couple of videos I watched, they used expanding foam at the top and bottom of the foam insulation boards. No there is no drain around the cove joint (inside) and from what I've seen of the exposed foundation, there isn't one outside either.

I have more foam board than I need, due to the way I had to order it in order to get it at cost, but I'm still considering building a way as you describe.
 
 

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