Finished Wall Against Cinder Block in Basement?


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Old 12-10-14, 05:09 AM
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Finished Wall Against Cinder Block in Basement?

Hi all. I'm new here but have done a fair amount of reading in the past.

I am finishing my basement and have an issue I'm not sure how to tackle. The one side of my basement stairs is right up against the cinder block wall. This leaves me no room for furring strips and drywall as that would be as wide as my stair stringer and leave no room for baseboards down the steps. (I should note that my stairs are the kind where the stringer is not cut, the steps and risers are routed into the stringer).

My question is: what are my options if I want a finished (drywall or drywall like) wall against a cinder block wall with no room for furring strips?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-10-14, 10:01 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I'd be inclined to leave it block and just paint it to match the rest. There are some that will screw/glue drywall directly to block but if the block retains any moisture it will degrade the drywall.

A pic or to might alter or garner more advice - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 12-16-14, 08:09 PM
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-glue plastic bead board to that section.

-Plaster directly over the concrete and try to achieve as smooth a finish as drywall, not sure the best product to use directly to concrete primed/unprimed.

-Put a plastic vapor barrier sheet over the concrete, seal the whole perimeter before putting the plastic on with sealant that won't eat through the type of plastic, or just drylock the wall a few times. Put the drywall over the plastic and/or drylock and predrill for concrete screws. You probably won't need a million screws, and you should maybe put globs of sealant behind the drywall and mark them on the front where to screw so the screw holes are sealed, sort of. You might get good long term results just installing mold-preventive drywall right over the wall though and gluing it and putting some predrilled screws. Maybe you can put the mold-preventive drywall on backwards so the moisture barrier is facing the wall. I think that's a fire hazard for some reason and maybe the mud won't stick so good to the other side unless maybe primed though. But regular 1/2" drywall in contact w/ concrete will pass inspection in most cases, and that's even if it's drywall fireblocking which is being relied on to not be eaten away at from moisture even the slightest bit to maintain an air tight bay in case of an electrical fire within the wall framing.

really, I'd just thin coat right over the concrete, get it as smooth as possible and make it look like drywall, prime and paint.
 

Last edited by gunner666; 12-16-14 at 10:48 PM.
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Old 12-17-14, 03:24 AM
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glue plastic bead board to that section.
Puke, no.
Plaster directly over the concrete
Stucco, maybe, but not plaster, as it won't hold up.
plastic vapor barrier sheet over the concrete
I think you are grabbing at straws with this. The op is probably only talking about a 4 or 5' section of wall. Lotta work where paint would suffice. Anything put up that will hold moisture such as plastic or sheetrock, will eventually cause problems. Paint can be a little more forgiving if prepped properly.
I'd just thin coat right over the concrete
Bingo.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 02:06 PM
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glue foam insulation board to wall and prime it and paint it many coats so it look smooth like sheetrock. Gets insulation too. not sure if it's a fire code to always needs something over the face of foam boards such as drywalling it, but maybe you can get fireproof paint or something or just not worry about it. I mean a can of gas is a fire hazard but you can store that in your basement, right?
 
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Old 12-17-14, 02:12 PM
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It's not that the foam is a fire hazard, it's that it gives off toxic chemicals when it burns.
 
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Old 12-17-14, 03:01 PM
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fireproof paint
I had a gallon of this stuff, somewhere. Darned if I can find it You can store gas in the basement, but if it ignites, all bets are off. Similar to the foam as mitch17 says.
Remember the OP is limited to space, so adding layers is not in the program.
 
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Old 12-18-14, 02:26 AM
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It's not that the foam is a fire hazard, it's that it gives off toxic chemicals when it burns.

never mind the house is on fire, what's burning has toxic fumes!
I just thought these boards were highly flammable like an electrical spark within a bay or something hence why most I've seen require covered with something like sheetrock.

Remember the OP is limited to space, so adding layers is not in the program

nah, the stringer should be about an inch leaving space for 1/2" foam board and 1/2 base/shoe moulding would make it flush but if you can find foam 3/8 and base 3/8, it won't possibly hang over if the stringer's 7/8ths I'm guessing. You can find 1/4" ish foam board though but gives less insulating R. But I'd put the thickest foam board up I could without it handing over and just caulk the bottom without moulding.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 04:40 AM
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I'm willing to bet the stringer's not pressure treated, so why's it tight to the concrete? Maybe you can fish sheet metal behind it. I've seen untreated lumber last decades attached to foundation inside, but others can rot quick. If you carpet/veneer/etc the steps and it rots later would be even worse. If it happens to be a new home or stairs replaced in recent years and under warranty/guarantee maybe you can have them fixed.

I did a search about basement stairs pressure treated. Others had same question why stairs don't have to be pt, no real answer in the first page or two. Some say theirs are built with pt only on the bottom. Others say they've never seen them rot but the wall is probably more prone to rot it than the floor, depends on you foundation tar and everything.

Maybe you can pull it from the wall a tiny bit and tuck the sheet metal in and then redo some fastening to compensate for disturbing it, maybe tuck some flashing under the 1st step also.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 04:48 AM
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You are supposed to use PT lumber anywhere it comes in contact with masonry. How well non PT will last is dependent on how dry the masonry stays.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 04:49 AM
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nah, the stringer should be about an inch leaving space for 1/2" foam board
But you ain't there, and the OP hasn't furnished pictures, nor have they returned. We'll just wait on them to fill us in on this before we proceed with further speculative solutions.
 
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Old 12-19-14, 10:33 AM
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Yeah I know pt must contact any masonry, but I don't know how inspectors are sometimes picky but the non-pt stairs are apparently everywhere. And when they put a small deck included with a new house, they're sometimes on no footer at all, just a 4x4 way over height code max for 4x4 should be 6x6 and just sitting in the dirt ready to rot and frost heave and detach from the house and kill a family photo.
 
 

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