Starting basement office - insulation question


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Old 12-23-14, 08:44 PM
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Starting basement office - insulation question

Greetings DIY'ers. I am starting building an office in my look-out basement and two of the walls will be framed against the knee wall pictured here. I've read other posts and got everything about gluing and taping the XPS and making sure it's properly sealed. My question right now is, what do I do with this foil stuff? Do I leave it in or remove it? And do I need a moisture barrier against the foild (of if I remove the foil, the batt)?

Thanks in advance!



 
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Old 12-24-14, 04:11 AM
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Are you constructing walls out from the knee wall to make a flush installation? If the insulation is in good shape and sealed, I would leave it and build a wall 1" away from it all to make solid walls. Easier to run electrical through. You could supplement the insulation with Roxul batts, which would require no further vapor barrier. You say it is a "look" out rather than a "walk" out.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 07:27 AM
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I forgot to add that this is new construction. The house is a bit over a year old so insulation is in great shape. An yes, the basement is lookout only, no door, just 3 windows.

In regards to standing the wall I have options and definitely open to suggestions form the experts. I guess for simplicity sake my preference is to run the wall floor to ceiling, instead of creating any ledge or similar transition. When you say 1" away, do you mean from the XPS?
 
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Old 12-24-14, 08:02 AM
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Normally, unless my clients are in love with the ledge, I will run walls one inch from the concrete wall, floor to ceiling. I makes it easier to run electrical at the normal height. The one inch will allow for aberrations in the walls that allow your new wall to be perfectly straight without hitting the concrete. Building the wall out will also allow for moisture to not affect your final wall covering. Otherwise you would nave to glue your covering to the concrete. Not good.

What are your plans for this room? Duh, you said office. OK.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 08:57 AM
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That makes sense. For the foreseeable future this will be my office/hideout place. Window meets egress code in my area and I'll be so there's a possibility to safely throw a daybed or something if the need arises.
 
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Old 12-24-14, 09:08 AM
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That's cool. Let us know if we can assist.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 02:58 PM
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Today I finished gluing and taping the seams on the Foamular. Having completed that I planned to start my first wall but wasnt sure how to proceed with the bottom and top plates. This wall is the one where the sum pump tube exits the house. Total length is 9' 8". I only have 8 ft studs so my question is, do i use a whole 8 footer and a 20" section or should I shorten the 8 footer to something like 5ft and the have a 4ft section?
 
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Old 01-11-15, 05:57 PM
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You don't use studs for bottom plates. They must be pressure treated, so go buy a 10' PT piece for that as well as the remainder of your plates.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 06:48 PM
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Yes, I know. All bottom plates I got are PT. I can only transport 8 footers in my car so that's what i'll be using. When I do the whole basement I'll have longer pieces delivered but for now its just 8's.
 
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Old 01-11-15, 07:01 PM
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Be sure all Fasteners that attach to that pt are rated for that material, nails attaching the studs and screws for drywall. I've seen plain drywall screws reduced to almost nothing in 4 or 5 years.

Bud
 
 

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